Cosmetic Surgery Tips

Acupressure Points For Breast Reduction

Acupressure is a traditional Chinese practice that uses the fingers to apply pressure to key points on the body. These pressure points, called acupoints, are located in pairs along energy channels called meridians. By applying pressure to specific acupoints, you can stimulate the body’s natural healing abilities and improve your health.

Acupressure for breast reduction is one of the most popular uses for this treatment method. Breast reduction is a surgical procedure used to reduce the size of breasts that are too large or heavy for an individual’s frame. The procedure involves removing fat and glandular tissue from the breasts and tightening surrounding skin.

In this article we will discuss acupressure points for breast growth and 10 best acupressure points for weight loss

Acupressure Points and Massage Treatment

Used for thousands of years in China, acupressure applies the same principles as acupuncture to promote relaxation and wellness and to treat disease. Sometimes called pressure acupuncture, Acupressure is often thought of as simply acupuncture without the needles. But what exactly is acupressure and how does it work?

What Is the Theory Behind Acupressure?

Acupressure is just one of a number of Asian bodywork therapies (ABT) with roots in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Examples of other Asian bodywork therapies are medical qigong and Tuina. Shiatsu is a Japanese form of acupressure.

Traditional Chinese medical theory describes special acupoints, or acupressure points, that lie along meridians, or channels, in your body. These are the same energy meridians and acupoints as those targeted with acupuncture. It is believed that through these invisible channels flows vital energy — or a life force called qi (ch’i). It is also believed that these 12 major meridians connect specific organs or networks of organs, organizing a system of communication throughout your body. The meridians begin at your fingertips, connect to your brain, and then connect to an organ associated with a certain meridian.

According to this theory, when one of these meridians is blocked or out of balance, illness can occur. Acupressure and acupuncture are among the types of TCM that are thought to help restore balance.

How Does Acupressure Work?

Acupressure practitioners use their fingers, palms, elbows or feet, or special devices to apply pressure to acupoints on the body’s meridians. Sometimes, acupressure also involves stretching or acupressure massage, as well as other methods.

During an acupressure session, you lie fully clothed on a soft massage table. The practitioner gently presses on acupressure points on your body. A session typically lasts about one hour. You may need several sessions for the best results.

The Benefits and Uses of Acupressure

The goal of acupressure or other types of Asian bodywork is to restore health and balance to the body’s channels of energy and to regulate opposing forces of yin (negative energy) and yang (positive energy). Some proponents claim acupressure not only treats the energy fields and body but also the mind, emotions, and spirit. Some even believe that therapists can transmit the vital energy (external qi) to another person.

Not all Western practitioners believe that this is possible or even that these meridians exist. Instead, they attribute any results to other factors, such as reduced muscle tension, improved circulation, or stimulation of endorphins, which are natural pain relievers. Related Article

What Are Common Acupuncture Points?

There are literally hundreds of acupuncture points on the body — too many to name. Here are three that are commonly used by acupuncturists and acupressure practitioners:

  • Large intestine 4 (LI 4): This is in the soft, fleshy web between your thumb and forefinger.
  • Liver 3 (LR-3): Located on the top of your foot up from the space between your big toe and next toe.
  • Spleen 6 (SP-6): This is about three finger widths above your inner ankle bone.

Which Health Problems Benefit From Acupressure?

Research into the health benefits of acupressure is in its infancy. Many patient reports support its use for a number of health concerns. More well-designed research is needed, though. Here are a few health problems that appear to improve with acupressure:

Nausea. Several studies support the use of wrist acupressure to prevent and treat nausea and vomiting:

  • After surgery
  • During spinal anesthesia
  • After chemotherapy
  • From motion sickness
  • Related to pregnancy

The PC 6 acupressure point is located in the groove between the two large tendons on the inside of the wrist that start at the base of the palm. There are special wristbands that are sold over the counter. These press on similar pressure points and work for some people.

Cancer. In addition to relieving nausea right after chemotherapy, there are individual reports that acupressure also helps reduce stress, improve energy levels, relieve pain, and lessen other symptoms of cancer or its treatments. More research is needed to confirm these reports.

Pain. Some preliminary evidence suggests that acupressure may help with low back pain, postoperative pain, or headache. Pain from other conditions may benefit, as well. To relieve headache, the LI 4 pressure point is sometimes tried.

Arthritis. Some studies suggest that acupressure releases endorphins and promotes anti-inflammatory effects, helping with certain types of arthritis.

Depression and anxiety. More than one study suggests that fatigue and mood may improve from the use of acupressure. Better designed trials are needed to be sure.

Are There Any Precautions With Acupressure?

In general, acupressure is very safe. If you have cancer, arthritis, heart disease, or a chronic condition, be sure to have a discussion with your doctor before trying any therapy that involves moving joints and muscles, such as acupressure. And, make sure your acupressure practitioner is licensed and certified.

Deep tissue work such as acupressure may need to be avoided if any of the following conditions apply:

  • The treatment is in the area of a cancerous tumor or if the cancer has spread to bones
  • You have rheumatoid arthritis, a spinal injury, or a bone disease that could be made worse by physical manipulation
  • You have varicose veins
  • You are pregnant (because certain points may induce contractions)

Materials and methods: The search process for clinical trials on Massage and acupressure on breast engorgement was carried out systematically on the databases of PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane and Scopus using the main keywords of (Acupressure OR massage, breast engorgement OR latching) without the time restriction from inception until 10 February 2019 Results: The findings of four studies showed that acupressure has positive effects on the breast engorgement. In a study, an intervention protocol consisting of pamphlet and video preparation, massage (once a day for two days), breastfeeding training, counseling and support resulted in a greater reduction in breast size, lower sodium levels in breast milk, and greater breastfeeding than the control (no intervention) group. Another study showed that the decrease in breast engorgement intensity in the breast Oketani-massage group was significantly greater than the control group. Conclusion: A supportive approach can be used to improve the mild breast engorgement, and both acupressure and massage can be used to treat moderate and severe breast engorgement. Therapeutic measures can be accomplished alone or in combination with chemotherapy
ResearchGate Logo
Discover the world’s research

20+ million members
135+ million publications
700k+ research projects
Join for free

Public Full-text 1

Content uploaded by Hamed Jafarpour
Author content
Content may be subject to copyright.
Int J Pediatr, Vol.8, N.5, Serial No.77, May.2020 11227 Review Article (Pages: 11227-11232) http:// ijp.mums.ac.ir The Effect of Massage and Acupressure on Breast Engorgement: A Review Bahar Farshidfar1, Hamed Jafarpour2, Amir Hossein Salimi Kordasiabi3, Mohsen Hosseinzadegan4, Moghadaseh Jahanshahi5, Zanbagh Pirastehfar6, *Tahereh Galini Moghadam71 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. 2Medical Student, Student Research Committee, Faculty of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Science, Sari, Iran. 3MD, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran. 4Medical Student, Student Research Committee, Faculty of Medicine, Mazandaran University of Medical Science, Sari, Iran. 5Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Sayyad Shirazi Hospital, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran. 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Sari Imam Khomeini Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. 7Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Sari Imam Khomeini Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Abstract Background: Breast engorgement is a postpartum problem in postpartum mothers; more than two-thirds of women develop it. Therefore, various complementary medicine techniques are used to decrease severity of breast engorgement. We aimed to determine the effect of massage and acupressure on severity of breast engorgement in lactating mothers. Materials and Methods: In this review, the search process for clinical trials of massage and acupressure on breast engorgement in lactating mothers was carried out systematically on the databases of Medline, Web of Science, EMBASE, Cochrane and Scopus. The single and combined keywords of (Breast Hyperemia OR Breast Engorgement OR Treatment OR Therapeutics OR Therapy OR Lactating) AND (Acupressure OR Massage), without time restriction from inception up to February 10, 2019 were searched. Two reviewers did study selection. Results: Finally, six studies were included (with 581 participants). The findings of four studies showed that acupressure has positive effects on breast engorgement. In one study, an intervention protocol consisting of pamphlet and video preparation, massage (once a day for two days), breastfeeding training, counseling and support resulted in a greater reduction in breast size, lower sodium levels in breast milk, and greater breastfeeding than the control (no intervention) group. Another study showed that the decrease in breast engorgement intensity in the breast Oketani-massage group was significantly greater than the control group. Conclusion: A supportive approach can be used to improve mild breast engorgement, and both acupressure and massage can be used to treat moderate and severe breast engorgement. Therapeutic measures can be accomplished alone or in combination with pharmacology. Key Words: Acupressure, Breast Engorgement, Massage, Lactating Mother. *Please cite this article as Farshidfar B, Jafarpour H, Salimi Kordasiabi AH, Hosseinzadegan M, Jahanshahi M, Pirastehfar Z, et al. The Effect of Massage and Acupressure on Breast Engorgement: A Review. Int J Pediatr 2020; 8(5): 112275-32. DOI: 10.22038/ijp.2020.47417.3847 *Corresponding Author: Tahereh Galini Moghadam, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, Sari Imam Khomeini Hospital, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran. Email: taheremoghaddam@yahoo.com Received date: Nov.14, 2019; Accepted date: Feb.12, 2020
Effect of Massage and Acupressure on Breast Engorgement Int J Pediatr, Vol.8, N.5, Serial No.77, May.2020 11228 1- INTRODUCTION Breastfeeding is an art and needs skill (1), which plays an important role in providing food safety to a large portion of infants in the world (2), and is the best way for maternal health and growth of a healthy infant. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that the infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. However, some of the problems that occur in the early postpartum period have a negative impact on sucking and breastfeeding. Therefore, early detection and resolution of breastfeeding problems observed in the postpartum period are essential for maternal and infant health (3, 4). According to the WHO, about 98% of mothers should be able to exclusively breastfeed their babies up to 6 months (1). Some of the common disorders of breastfeeding in the first days after birth include low milk volume, nipple pain and injury, breast engorgement, and other more serious problems such as mastitis (1). Breast engorgement has been introduced as the third maternal factor affecting breastfeeding cessation (5). Studies showed that up to 92% of primiparous mothers have trouble in breastfeeding (2). Breast engorgement is one of the postpartum problems among breastfeeding mothers, which often occurs between 3-5 days postpartum, and affects more than two-thirds of women by the fifth day after delivery, as well as up to 9 and 10 days after delivery in some women (5). As a normal process, mother’s breasts are full of milk almost two days after giving birth, which causes heaviness and swelling of the breasts; under normal conditions, the breasts should not be stiff and painful. A sudden increase in milk volume during the puerperal period, lymphatic and vascular density and increased interstitial fluid of the breast may develop breast engorgement in the mother (6), which may affect the area around the nipple and areola or entire breast, and may damage one or both breasts. Following breast engorgement, the swelling around the nipple may make the baby unable to feed successfully, and this may worsen the engorgement. If the mothers are concerned about having enough milk, or pain and swelling of the breast, this problem may become complicated and discourage women from continuing breastfeeding. In addition, the mothers may receive limited advice and support from health professionals; absence of awareness in managing this condition can worsen it (7). The breast engorgement can lead to breast abscesses (8). Non-pharmacological treatments for breast engorgement are becoming increasingly prevalent (9, 10). Some recommended non-pharmacological interventions in breast engorgement include proper breastfeeding training, frequent breastfeeding, and use of cold compresses on the breast during lactation intervals (11), use of warm compresses immediately before breastfeeding (11-14), whole-breast massage by hand (5), and acupuncture (15, 16). Nevertheless, due to the side effects of medications, acupuncture is recommended in this regard (2). Selection of the correct points to stimulate is very important in acupuncture. Acupressure is one of the complementary therapies, and is based on the principles of acupuncture. In this review, we aimed to determine the effect of massage and acupressure on the severity of breast engorgement in lactating mothers. 2- MATERIALS AND METHODS 2-1. Search strategy In this review, all clinical trials and non-clinical trials evaluating the effect of massage and acupressure on breast engorgement of lactating women were searched on the electronic databases of Scopus, EMBASE, Cochrane, Web of Science and Medline (via PubMed) with no language or time restrictions (up to
Farshidfar et al. Int J Pediatr, Vol.8, N.5, Serial No.77, May. 2020 11229 February 10, 2019). The single and combination keywords of: (Breast Hyperemia OR, Breast Engorgement OR Treatment OR Therapeutics OR Therapy OR Lactating) AND (Acupressure OR Massage), and their Persian synonyms and all their possible combinations, were searched in the national databases (Magiran, SID, and Iran.Doc). Two independent researchers performed the search process and a supervisor resolved any discrepancies in this regard. 2-2. Included studies Randomized controlled trials (RCT), clinical studies both randomized and nonrandomized either retrospective or prospective. Due to the limited number of published RCT in the literature, other types of clinical studies were included. Pilot, preliminary and case report studies were not included due to the limited sample size and the higher risk of bias. Studies published in Persian and English up to February 10, 2019. 2-3. Selection process Two reviewers, initially reviewed the abstracts of searched articles, downloaded their full texts to review carefully, then chose the relevant studies independently. Finally, the articles that met the inclusion criteria were enrolled in the review, and relevant references were reviewed to find further studies. The third reviewer resolved any discrepancies. 3- RESULTS Finally, six studies with 581 participants were included in this review. In one study, the participants were 205 mothers with inflammatory symptoms of the breast during lactation. The mothers were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups, two of which included acupuncture in the care interventions and one involving the use of oxytocin nasal spray. Significant differences were found in the mean Severity Index (SI) on contact days 3 and 4 between oxytocin nasal spray group and the two acupuncture groups (15). In the second study, eight mothers were randomized into three treatment groups. All three groups were given advice regarding emptying of the breasts and care in the form of comfort interventions. The acupuncture was included in the treatment regime for two of the groups and the oxytocin nasal spray in the third group. Mothers in all groups expressed relative satisfaction with the breastfeeding situation despite considerable discomfort. There was no significant difference between the groups (16). In the third study, the patients were randomly divided into two compress group and acupressure group. The score of hyperemia intensity in both left and right breasts showed a significant decrease in the compress group (hot and cold) than in the acupressure group (7). A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 54 postpartum women with breast engorgement. The Gua-Sha protocol selected appropriate position of acupoints, which included ST16, ST18, SP17 and CV17. Each position was lightly scraped seven times in two cycles. The researchers used hot packs and massage for 20 minutes in the control group according to recommendations given in an obstetrical technique textbook. Body temperature, breast temperature, breast engorgement, pain levels, and discomfort levels were statistically different between the 2 groups at 5 and 30 minutes after intervention (p<0.001). The results of generalized estimating equation analysis indicated that all variables, except for body temperature, remained more significant (p<0.0001) to improve the engorgement symptoms in the experimental group than those in the control group, after taking related variables into account (17). Cho and Ahn (2014), in a pre/post-test study without homogenization with the control group, aimed to provide a program to improve

Movements, Massage, and Pressure Points for Beautiful, Happy Breasts

breast pressure

Overview
Breast pain (mastalgia) can be described as tenderness, throbbing, sharp, stabbing, burning pain or tightness in the breast tissue. The pain may be constant or it may occur only occasionally, and it can occur in men, women and transgender people.

Breast pain can range from mild to severe. It may occur:

Just a few days a month, in the two to three days leading up to a menstrual period. This normal, mild-to-moderate pain affects both breasts.
A week or longer each month, starting before a period and sometimes continuing through the menstrual cycle. The pain may be moderate or severe, and affects both breasts.
Throughout the month, not related to a menstrual cycle.
In men, breast pain is most commonly caused by a condition called “gynecomastia” (guy-nuh-koh-MAS-tee-uh). This refers to an increase in the amount of breast gland tissue that’s caused by an imbalance of the hormones estrogen and testosterone. Gynecomastia can affect one or both breasts, sometimes unevenly.

In transgender women, hormone therapy may cause breast pain. In transgender men, breast pain may be caused by the minimal amount of breast tissue that may remain after a mastectomy.

Most times, breast pain signals a noncancerous (benign) breast condition and rarely indicates breast cancer. Unexplained breast pain that doesn’t go away after one or two menstrual cycles, or that persists after menopause, or breast pain that doesn’t seem to be related to hormone changes needs to be evaluated.

Products & Services
Book: Mayo Clinic Guide to Pain Relief
Show more products from Mayo Clinic
Symptoms
Breast pain can be cyclic or noncyclic. Cyclic means that the pain occurs on a regular pattern. Noncyclic means that the pain is constant, or that there’s not a regular pattern. Each type of breast pain has distinct characteristics.

Breast pain characteristics
Cyclic breast pain Noncyclic breast pain
Clearly related to the menstrual cycle and changing hormone levels
Described as dull, heavy or aching
Often accompanied by breast swelling, fullness or lumpiness
Usually affects both breasts, particularly the upper, outer portions, and can radiate to the underarm
Intensifies during the two weeks leading up to the start of the menstrual period, then eases up afterward
More likely to affect people in their 20s and 30s, as well as people in their 40s who are transitioning to menopause
Unrelated to the menstrual cycle
Described as tight, burning, stabbing or aching sensation
Constant or intermittent
Usually affects one breast, in a localized area, but may spread more diffusely across the breast
In women, most likely to occur after menopause
Extramammary breast pain
The term “extramammary” means “outside the breast.” Extramammary breast pain feels like it starts in the breast tissue, but its source is actually outside the breast area. Pulling a muscle in the chest, for example, can cause pain in the chest wall or rib cage that spreads (radiates) to the breast. Arthritis that involves the cartilage in the chest, also known as costochondritis, can also cause pain.

When to see a doctor
Make an appointment with your doctor if breast pain:

Continues daily for more than a couple of weeks
Occurs in one specific area of your breast
Seems to be getting worse over time
Interferes with daily activities
Awakens you from sleep
Breast cancer risk is very low in people whose main symptom is breast pain, but if your doctor recommends an evaluation, it’s important to follow through.

Acupressure Points For Breast Growth

Touch the hridayam point (9), which is four finger widths below the top of the breastbone and roughly half an inch below the sternal angle, after the jatru marma point (6), which is at the top of the middle of the breast bone. Three, five, or seven times, gently pump this point before releasing it.

How to Reduce Breast Size: Natural Methods vs. Surgery

10 Best Acupressure Points For Weight Loss

the best acupressure spots for wellness and weight loss are:

The place where fat is burned is 1.5 inches below the navel.

  • The point is 2 inches below the navel and 2 inches on either side of the midline to ease constipation.

The point is about an inch above the naval along the midline to reduce edema and encourage detoxification.

The point is 4 inches above the navel and runs along the midline to improve metabolism.

The point is situated in the dip on the side of the outer calf bone, four fingers below the kneecap, and provides relief from weariness and stomach distress.

You can get headache relief via acupressure. (Shutterstock)
You can get headache relief via acupressure. (Shutterstock)

  • The point is situated in the fleshy webbing between the thumb and fingers, which provides relief from sinus and frontal headaches.
  • The point lies within your elbow, and it may be present if you have a food allergy, nausea, diarrhea, fever, or tennis elbow. Apply pressure to the depression at the outside end of the elbow fold by flexing your elbow.
  • The position is in the soles of your feet, in the depression that develops when the toes are curled, for persons who have memory problems, menopause symptoms, or oedema. Between the second and third metatarsals is where it is situated. Insomnia can be treated by massaging it before sleeping.

The site for gastrointestinal and gynecological problems is on the inside of the lower thigh, one hand up from the ankle bone.

The point is located on the top of your foot, above the toes, and in a dip between the first and second tendons. It can be used to treat conditions like hypertension, sleeplessness, diabetes, PMS, and painful breasts.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *