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Can aloe vera make your skin peel

Aloe vera is a popular ingredient in many over-the-counter skin care products, including moisturizers, cleansers, and even makeup. But can it cause peeling?

No. Aloe vera is a plant that’s common in your garden or grocery store, but you may not know that it’s also used to make your skin softer and smoother. It contains vitamins A and C, which help fight wrinkles and scars. It also contains antioxidants that help protect against sun damage. In this guide, we find out Can aloe vera make your skin peel, what to put on peeling sunburn, what to put on peeling sunburn face, and how long does skin peel after sunburn.

But does aloe vera make your skin peel? No way! The answer is no—aloe vera doesn’t cause peeling on your face or body at all.

Can aloe vera make your skin peel

Why Aloe Vera Deserves a Place in Your Skin Care Routine

  • Benefits
  • Fresh vs. bottled aloe vera
  • How to apply

Aloe vera is a powerhouse of a botanical, packed with vitamins, minerals, and anti-inflammatory compounds that provide healing relief from irritation. From sunburns to acne, this plant has been used for centuries to soothe and heal a variety of skin ailments. But when it comes to applying aloe vera to your face, is it really safe? Let’s break down the facts.

First and foremost, aloe vera is generally safe for most skin types. Its natural anti-inflammatory properties make it a great option for soothing redness, irritation, and inflammation. Its moisturizing qualities can also help hydrate and nourish the skin without clogging pores. However, it’s always important to do a patch test before applying aloe vera to your face, especially if you have sensitive skin or are prone to allergies.

When it comes to acne-prone skin, aloe vera can be a game-changer. Its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties can help reduce redness and inflammation associated with breakouts. It can also help to unclog pores and reduce excess oil production, leading to clearer, healthier skin. Additionally, the antioxidants present in aloe vera can help to promote healing and reduce the appearance of acne scars.

For those with dry or aging skin, aloe vera can be a savior. Its hydrating properties can help to plump and moisturize the skin, reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. Aloe vera also contains vitamins C and E, which are known for their skin-healing and antioxidant properties. These vitamins can help to improve skin texture, tone, and overall appearance.

In conclusion, aloe vera is indeed safe for your face and can provide a multitude of benefits for your skin. Its natural healing properties make it a great option for soothing irritation, reducing inflammation, and promoting overall skin health. Just remember to do a patch test before applying aloe vera to your face, and consult with a dermatologist if you have any concerns or specific skin conditions. Give this superhero of the botanical world a try and watch your skin transform before your eyes.

Benefits of Aloe Vera for the FaceReduces inflammation and rednessMoisturizes and nourishes the skinHelps to unclog pores and reduce acneHydrates and plumps dry or aging skinImproves skin texture and tone

The short answer: Absotutely (to quote Leslie Knope). But you need to use it the right way. Here’s why aloe vera deserves a prominent spot in your medicine cabinet.

aloe vera for face

Why it’s great for skin

  1. It can help combat acne. Studies have shown that people with mild to moderate acne can benefit from using oral aloe vera products to treat their irritated skin. Just be sure to talk with your doctor before using it — especially if you’re combining it with prescription products like isotretinoin, which is used to treat cystic acne.
  2. It can help fade dark spots and acne scars. Even if your acne isn’t a problem at the moment, those pesky scars can stick around for years. Aloe vera gel helps stimulate the production of collagen in the skin, which reduces the appearance of scarring.
  3. It soothes sunburns. Aloe vera gel is known for its cooling, soothing properties, and it feels amazing on your skin when you’re suffering from a sunburn. It’s not clear whether it actually helps the sunburn heal faster (some studies say it doesn’t) but it does lessen the discomfort and help with redness and peeling.
  4. It moisturizes dry skin. The plant contains a high number of mucopolysaccharides (try saying that five times fast), a type of molecule chain with hydrating properties that’s a common ingredient in many moisturizers.
  5. It can treat cold sores. The antiviral effects of aloe vera makes it a useful topical treatment to help with cold sores. Be careful, though — you can still pass on oral herpes to others if you have an active breakout (and aloe vera sadly can’t make it less contagious).
  6. It provides relief from psoriasis and eczema. Psoriasis and eczema can feel like an awful combination of a burn and a super itchy rash. Thankfully, aloe vera has been shown to both moisturize and soothe these trouble spots on your skin.
  7. It reduces puffiness and dark circles. Remember the collagen-producing effects of aloe vera? Those don’t just help with acne scars. They also reduce overall inflammation in the face and help with the production of new skin — which makes you look radiant and glowy AF.
  8. It’s a natural exfoliant. The salicylic acid in the plant helps get rid of dead skin cells and bad bacteria on your face. It’s lightly exfoliating and won’t rub your skin raw.
  9. It may slow signs of aging. Science is still inconclusive on this one, but some studies of aloe vera have shown promising effects in its ability to increase skin elasticity over time. No wonder it’s a popular ingredient in many some studies of aloe vera  
  10. It’s good for most people with sensitive skin. In its pure form, aloe vera gel is 100 percent natural, so it’s a great go-to product for many people who struggle with using chemicals on their skin. Just be sure to test a small amount on your wrist or inner part of your arm before putting it on your face, to make sure you aren’t allergic to the plant itself.
Aloe Vera Gel for Face and Skin: 8 Benefits, Uses and Side Effects | Be  Beautiful India

Fresh vs. bottled aloe vera: Is there a difference?

Before you run out to purchase and grow your own aloe plant, know that you have multiple options here. Store-bought varieties can be as effective as gel harvested from an aloe plant.

Many drugstore and higher-end skin care products contain aloe vera gel in their ingredient list, but usually not a lot of it. Look for products that specifically list aloe vera as a primary ingredient (aka one the first few listed).

Bottled aloe can be purchased at the drugstore, but it sometimes contains additives to make it last longer at room temperature.

The FDA does not currently regulate the safety of aloe vera products, and according to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, not enough is known about the plant’s effects to definitively deem it useful for skin treatments.

The NCCIH does say the plant is likely safe when used topically.

To DIY your skin care product and get straight to the source, you can grow your own aloe at home. The gel comes from inside of the plant leaf, so cut it open with a clean knife and separate the gel from the prickly stalk.

Store the gel in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week, and use it on your skin as needed.

How to use aloe vera for maximum results

If you’ve never used aloe vera before, caution is key. Start by applying a small amount of the plant to your skin, somewhere other than your face (like your arm or thigh).

Wait at least 24 hours to test for an allergic reaction. If you don’t notice anything amiss, you can begin using it in larger quantities.

There are lots of home recipes out there for all-natural aloe vera face masks .Depending on your specific skin conditions, you may want to tailor these ingredients to whatever works best for your face.

To avoid clogging your pores, don’t leave the gel on for hours (especially when you’re first experimenting with it). Start by using it for only 5 or 10 minutes at a time, and work up from there.

If you have a specific skin problem you’re looking to treat, it’s best to rely on the advice of your dermatologist or primary care doctor before you stock up on a bunch of new products. Ask them about aloe vera gel if you’re curious.

Sadly, there’s not enough scientific evidence to formally designate it as a cure for most conditions — but that hasn’t stopped it from becoming a cult favorite product that tons of people swear by.

Do your research (and proceed with healthy caution) as you try it out for yourself.

  • Many people tout the benefits of using aloe vera on your face. The plant gel has been shown to help with acne, sunburns, dark spots, dry skin, cold sores, irritation, and inflammation. It may also reduce the appearance of wrinkles over time.
  • You can buy skin care products containing aloe vera, bottled aloe, or grow your own aloe plant and harvest the gel to use on your skin.
  • To use fresh aloe on your skin as a face mask, mix the gel with other natural ingredients like coconut oil, honey, and lemon. Leave it on for 10 to 15 minutes and rinse.
  • Don’t ingest aloe vera. Not enough is known about whether it is safe for consumption.
  • Talk with your doctor if you have specific skin problems you’re looking to treat. Aloe vera is safe and generally good for sensitive skin, but some people are allergic to the plant itself. Test a small amount on your arm or thigh before using it on your face.
Aloe Vera Uses - 12 Things You Can Do With Aloe Vera Gel

10 Benefits of Using Aloe Vera on Your Face

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Aloe vera is perhaps one of the most widely used herbal remedies for topical skin conditions. This is because the gel-like components of the plant are known to heal the skin from a variety of minor ailments.

In fact, you might have even used aloe in the past for sunburn, minor cuts, or small abrasions.

Despite its healing powers, you may be wondering if it’s safe for using on your face. Generally speaking, the answer is yes. When used correctly, aloe vera can help with a variety of ailments that might affect your skin. Below are 10 of these benefits.

Base ingredient vs. plant

The aloe vera we use on our skin in over-the-counter (OTC) gels is derived from plants of the same name.

In fact, there’s more than one kind of aloe, with an estimated 420 different speciesTrusted Source. The most commonly used form for skin conditions is a plant called aloe barbadensis Miller.

In conventional medicine, aloe vera is used as a topical gel, which is made from the gel-like substance inside the plant’s leaves. It’s also possible to use the leaves directly by breaking them apart and pressing out the gel.

However, it’s much easier to use gel that’s ready to go, especially in the case of emergency burns and wounds. OTC aloe gel may also contain other skin-soothing ingredients, such as echinacea and calendula.

Benefits

If you’re dealing with a chronic skin condition, it’s a good idea to check with your dermatologist before applying any products to your face. Talk to your doctor about the following potential benefits of aloe vera:

1. Burns

For minor burns, apply aloe vera gel to the affected area up to three times daily. You may also need to protect the area with gauze.

2. Sunburn

While aloe vera helps soothe sunburn, researchTrusted Source shows that it’s not an effective way to prevent sunburn, so make sure you wear sun protection every day!

3. Small abrasions

If you’ve scuffed up your chin or forehead, you can apply aloe vera to the area for quick relief from pain and burning sensations. Use three times per day.

4. Cuts

If you’re used to grabbing Neosporin for a minor cut, consider trying aloe vera instead. Its molecular structure helps heal wounds quickly and minimizes scarring by boosting collagen and fighting bacteria. Apply up to three times per day.

5. Dry skin

Aloe vera gel absorbs easily, making it ideal for oily skin. However, it can help treat dry skin, too. Consider swapping out your regular moisturizer for aloe after bathing to help seal moisture into your skin.

6. Frostbite

Frostbite is a serious condition that requires emergency medical treatment. While aloe vera gel has been used historically as a frostbite remedy, ask your doctor first before trying it.

7. Cold sores

Unlike canker sores, cold sores develop on the outside of your mouth. Aloe vera may help treat the herpes virus, which is also the underlying cause of cold sores. Apply a small amount of the gel to your cold sore twice daily until it goes away.

8. Eczema

The moisturizing effects of aloe can help alleviate dry, itchy skin associated with eczema. Aloe vera gel may also help alleviate seborrheic dermatitis. While this oily form of eczema is most often found in the scalp, it can also affect parts of your face and behind the ears, too.

9. Psoriasis

As with eczema, aloe vera may help alleviate inflammation and itchiness from psoriasis. For best results, apply aloe vera gel twice daily to the affected area of skin.

10. Inflammatory acne

Due to the anti-inflammatory effects of aloe vera, the gel may help treat inflammatory forms of acne, such as pustules and nodules. Apply the gel with a cotton swab directly to the pimple three times daily.

What to look for

The insides of an aloe plant’s leaves are the most potent form of aloe vera gel. However, not everyone has an aloe plant hanging around their house. In such cases, OTC products work just as well. For the best results, look for a gel that lists aloe vera as its main ingredient.

For skin ailments, aloe vera extracts don’t work as well as gel. This is because the gel itself has moisturizing elements to protect and heal the skin.

Side effects and cautions

While considered safe in topical form when used as directed, the Food and Drug Administration doesn’t regulate aloe vera products. This means that it’s up to you, the consumer, to use aloe vera safely and to report any adverse skin reactions to your doctor.

You may also consider steering clear of aloe vera if you have a severe burn or other significant wounds. In fact, there’s even some evidenceTrusted Source that aloe may decrease your skin’s natural ability to heal from deep wounds related to surgery.

Some users may experience itching or slight burning as the aloe vera goes to work in your skin. However, if you experience a rash or hives, you could have a sensitivity to the gel and should stop using it immediately.

Don’t use aloe vera gel on infected skin. While the gel has microbial properties, its protective layer can disrupt the healing process and make an infection worse.

The bottom line

Aloe vera may be a source of natural treatment for a variety of skin ailments. Still, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative HealthTrusted Source says there’s not enough definitive evidence to support all the purported benefits of aloe, though it’s safe when used on the skin.

Remember that topical aloe gel isn’t the same as using the plant directly on your face.

If you use aloe vera on your skin and don’t see any improvements within a few days, call your dermatologist. They can help with specific concerns you have regarding your overall skin health.

what to put on peeling sunburn

This article was medically reviewed by Mona Gohara, M.D., a board-certified dermatologist and member of the Prevention Medical Review Board.

You overdid the sun and underdid the sunscreen. Instead of rocking a golden glow, you’re a red-hot mess—and in a few days, you may be a flaky one, too.

But why, exactly, does your skin start to peel after a particularly bad sunburn? It all comes down to UV exposure. “Regardless of whether skin sheds or not, UV light can cause skin damage,” explains board-certified dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “However, if your skin peels, then generally speaking there is a greater degree of damage.”

There are two main types of UV rays and sunlight contains a mix of both, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. UVA rays are less intense but more prevalent than UVB rays. They penetrate the skin deeply, causing DNA damage and premature aging (think: sun spots and wrinkles). UVB rays, on the other hand, are the main cause of sunburn. Both play a role in the development of skin cancer.

When you don’t wear protective clothing or skimp on SPF, this UV radiation can wreak havoc on your skin cells. (In fact, just one or two blistering sunburns—or five non-blistering sunburns—can double your lifetime risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.) As a result, your body goes into damage control mode by trying to shed them. Hello, peeling skin.

How long does it take to peel after a sunburn?

It can take anywhere from three days to a week for peeling to start after a sunburn. The full process can last up to two weeks. As tempting as those flakes may be, do not pick or pull at them. “Peeling the skin can be gratifying as you see the flakes disappear—very much like the satisfaction people get from picking pimples,” explains Dr. Zeichner. “But it can further disrupt the skin barrier, leading to open, raw skin and increasing your risk of an infection.” Similarly, if blisters develop, do not pop them. It’s your skin’s way of protecting itself until it heals.

How to get rid of sunburn peeling fast

Once the damage is done, you can’t totally stop peeling from happening. However, you can help nourish and heal the healthy skin underneath.

“Keeping skin hydrated and protected can minimize the amount of noticeable dead skin. It will also minimize the itch and irritation,” says Samantha Conrad, M.D., board-certified dermatologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. That means loading up on plenty of water and keeping your skin as moisturized as possible.

“A healthy skin barrier can help repair itself the best it can. A sunburn disrupts that barrier, leading to loss of hydration and inflammation,” adds Dr. Zeichner. “Use hydrating cleansers and moisturizers, like Dove Deep Moisture Body Wash and Vaseline Clinical Care Extremely Dry Rescue Lotion, to keep the skin in as good shape as possible.” Apply your moisturizer after a cool shower, when the skin is still slightly damp, to lock in hydration.

Dr. Conrad also recommends applying pure aloe vera (test a patch of skin first, to make sure you aren’t allergic!) and 1% hydrocortisone cream two to three times a day.

If your sunburn peeling is painful, taking an over-the-counter pain medication like ibuprofen or soaking in a cool bath can help you find relief. If you want to take it up a notch, consider adding oatmeal to your bath; research shows the ingredient has anti-inflammatory properties that can soothe dryness and itching.

what to put on peeling sunburn face

Peeling skin, also known as desquamation, occurs when the outer layer of your skin is shed as damage to your skin heals. It can be caused by external events, such as a burn, or internal causes, such as a reaction to medication or an autoimmune disease.

In some cases, treatment may be simple and involves over-the-counter (OTC) or home remedies. Peeling skin could also be a sign of an underlying health condition that requires treatment.

Causes of Skin Peeling

When the skin peels, it is usually a part of the healing process after it has been damaged. There are many different causes of this damage, including:

When to See a Doctor

Peeling skin isn’t always serious, but it can be. Symptoms that should prompt you to see your doctor include:

Treat Underlying Conditions First

If your skin is peeling and you are unsure of the cause, see a doctor in order to help rule out serious health conditions.

The health condition that is causing the skin to peel should be treated first before trying remedies that may do harm. For example, there are no available treatments for peeling skin syndrome, and using home remedies may make the peeling even worse.

How to Get Rid of Peeling Skin

Getting rid of peeling skin depends on what is causing it. For example, if your skin is peeling after you get a sunburn, the best thing you can do is to leave it alone. If the injury is superficial and not serious, there are a few things you can do to help the skin heal.

Pat Skin Dry After Bathing

After you shower or bathe, pat your skin dry gently as opposed to rubbing it. This is because harsh rubbing with a towel can make peeling skin worse. It can also dry the skin further, causing it to become even more flaky.

Stay Hydrated

Staying hydrated can help keep your skin moisturized, which can reduce peeling overall. When the skin isn’t dry, it is less likely to peel further following skin damage.

Apply Moisturizer

As soon as you exit the bath or shower, the water on your skin begins to evaporate and your skin dries. This is why you should apply moisturizer right after bathing, when the skin is still damp. This will help lock in the moisture and prevent your skin from drying out. Since dry skin can cause a damaged area to peel more, it’s important to stay moisturized as best as you can.

Use a Gentle Exfoliant

In some cases, a gentle exfoliant can help remove the dead skin cells that are flaking off. However, this should not be done to sunburned skin since it can make the burn worse and prolong the healing period.

Try a Humidifier

Using a humidifier can help with mild skin peeling if it’s caused by dry skin. This is because humidifiers add moisture back into the air, which can help relieve dryness of the skin.

Summary

Peeling skin is a sign that your skin is healing after it’s been damaged. The damage can be a result of external or internal factors. Peeling skin caused by external factors like sunburn will typically heal on its own without interventions, but peeling skin caused by an underlying condition needs to be looked at and treated by a doctor.

A Word From Verywell

Peeling skin can be unsightly and irritating to cope with, but it is often not a sign of a serious condition. The good news is that if peeling skin is caused by sunburn, it will heal on its own.

For those who have peeling skin due to an underlying health condition, getting a prompt diagnosis and treatment is vital to recovery. Many conditions that can cause peeling skin will also present with other symptoms. A healthcare professional will be able to assess the cause and help you feel better.

Frequently Asked Questions

In children, COVID-19 had been linked to cases where the skin on the hands and feet begins peeling. This is a rare symptom and seems to be most common among children with mild COVID.

One of the most common causes of peeling feet is athlete’s foot, a condition in which a fungus grows on the skin, causing cracking, peeling, and flaking skin. Athlete’s foot is curable with over-the-counter and prescriptions treatments. However, there are other causes for peeling and foot rashes. Talk to a healthcare provider about any unusual changes in your skin.

Your body needs to shed the damaged skin, so you can’t stop the peeling, but you can relieve the pain and help your skin heal. Moisturize the area with aloe vera or a soy-based skin moisturizer. Avoid petroleum or oil-based skin products that will make the sunburn worse. Stay hydrated and use ibuprofen or aspirin to relieve pain.

Different treatments work for different people. At-home moisturizer treatments you can try include tea tree oil, coconut oil, or aloe vera products. Soaking in a tub with colloidal oatmeal, Dead Sea salts, or a baking soda bath can also help. Wearing soft fabrics can ease skin irritation and reduce flaking and peeling.

how long does skin peel after sunburn

You overdid the sun and underdid the sunscreen. Instead of rocking a golden glow, you’re a red-hot mess—and in a few days, you may be a flaky one, too.

But why, exactly, does your skin start to peel after a particularly bad sunburn? It all comes down to UV exposure. “Regardless of whether skin sheds or not, UV light can cause skin damage,” explains board-certified dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, M.D., director of cosmetic and clinical research in dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “However, if your skin peels, then generally speaking there is a greater degree of damage.”

There are two main types of UV rays and sunlight contains a mix of both, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. UVA rays are less intense but more prevalent than UVB rays. They penetrate the skin deeply, causing DNA damage and premature aging (think: sun spots and wrinkles). UVB rays, on the other hand, are the main cause of sunburn. Both play a role in the development of skin cancer.

When you don’t wear protective clothing or skimp on SPF, this UV radiation can wreak havoc on your skin cells. (In fact, just one or two blistering sunburns—or five non-blistering sunburns—can double your lifetime risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.) As a result, your body goes into damage control mode by trying to shed them. Hello, peeling skin.

How long does it take to peel after a sunburn?

Sunburn is a common skin condition that occurs when the skin is exposed to excessive amounts of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. It can range from mild redness and discomfort to more severe blistering and peeling. After a sunburn, it can take anywhere from three days to a week for peeling to start, and the full process can last up to two weeks. It may be tempting to pick or pull at the peeling skin, much like people are often tempted to pick at pimples, but this can actually do more harm than good.

Dr. Zeichner, a dermatologist, warns against picking at peeling skin, as it can disrupt the skin barrier and lead to open, raw skin, increasing the risk of infection. The skin is in the process of healing itself after a sunburn, and picking at it can interfere with this natural healing process. Similarly, if blisters develop as a result of the sunburn, it is important not to pop them. The blisters are a protective response from the skin to shield itself from further damage until it has healed.

It is important to take care of your skin after a sunburn to aid in the healing process and prevent further damage. This includes keeping the skin moisturized, drinking plenty of water to stay hydrated, and avoiding further sun exposure until the skin has fully healed. If the sunburn is severe or if you experience symptoms such as fever, chills, or nausea, it is important to seek medical attention.

In summary, peeling after a sunburn can be a normal part of the healing process, but it is important not to pick or pull at the peeling skin. By allowing the skin to heal on its own, you can help prevent infection and promote healthy skin regeneration. Remember to take care of your skin and protect it from further sun damage to prevent future sunburns.

How to get rid of sunburn peeling fast

Once the damage is done, you can’t totally stop peeling from happening. However, you can help nourish and heal the healthy skin underneath.

“Keeping skin hydrated and protected can minimize the amount of noticeable dead skin. It will also minimize the itch and irritation,” says Samantha Conrad, M.D., board-certified dermatologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. That means loading up on plenty of water and keeping your skin as moisturized as possible.

“A healthy skin barrier can help repair itself the best it can. A sunburn disrupts that barrier, leading to loss of hydration and inflammation,” adds Dr. Zeichner. “Use hydrating cleansers and moisturizers, like Dove Deep Moisture Body Wash and Vaseline Clinical Care Extremely Dry Rescue Lotion, to keep the skin in as good shape as possible.” Apply your moisturizer after a cool shower, when the skin is still slightly damp, to lock in hydration.

Dr. Conrad also recommends applying pure aloe vera (test a patch of skin first, to make sure you aren’t allergic!) and 1% hydrocortisone cream two to three times a day.

If your sunburn peeling is painful, taking an over-the-counter pain medication like ibuprofen or soaking in a cool bath can help you find relief. If you want to take it up a notch, consider adding oatmeal to your bath; research shows the ingredient has anti-inflammatory properties that can soothe dryness and itching.

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