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Can breast reduction cause death

Can breast reduction cause death?

This is a question that has come up recently, as the death of a 33-year-old woman has been attributed to her plastic surgery.

The woman, who was living in the United States, underwent breast reduction surgery in 2015. She died almost two years later, and her family says she died due to complications from the surgery. In this guide, we review the aspects of can breast reduction cause death, can breast reduction cause cancer, common problems after breast reduction surgery, and how to lose belly fat after breast reduction.

The woman’s family is suing the plastic surgeon who performed the procedure and is seeking damages for what they say were negligent practices that led to her death. The family claims that the doctor failed to inform them of possible risks involved with this type of procedure, including infection and nerve damage (which can lead to paralysis). They also claim that he did not properly monitor her after surgery or provide adequate care when issues arose during recovery.

While it is not clear whether or not these allegations are true, it does raise questions about how much information patients are given before undergoing cosmetic procedures such as breast reduction. It also raises questions about whether or not doctors should be held liable for any complications that occur during surgery or after recovery.

can breast reduction cause death

Background: Previously published articles presenting rates for lipoplasty morbidity and mortality have reported on procedures performed before mid 1998.

Objective: The present survey reports on morbidity and mortality for lipoplasty procedures performed by members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) from September 1, 1998, through August 31, 2000. It assesses whether ASAPS-member surgeons have modified their lipoplasty practices in accordance with the 1998 recommendations of the Lipoplasty Task Force.

Methods: In September 2000, ASAPS sent out a 4-page questionnaire to 1432 Active Members, all of whom were board-certified plastic surgeons. The survey included questions about complications and fatal outcomes associated with lipoplasty procedures, performance of combination procedures, patient selection, changes in lipoplasty and anesthesia techniques, and surgical facility accreditation. Completed surveys were anonymous and were mailed by respondents directly to an independent research firm for collation. Further data analysis was conducted by an independent statistician.

Results: A total of 754 questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of 53%. ASAPS members reported on 94,159 lipoplasty procedures. In all, 66% of the procedures were lipoplasty only, 20% were lipoplasty without abdominoplasty but with one or more additional procedures, and 14% were lipoplasty with abdominoplasty, with or without any other procedures. The most frequently reported postoperative event was nausea/vomiting (1.02%, or 1 per 98 procedures). The most frequently reported major complication was skin slough (0.0903%, or 1 per 1107 procedures). In all, there were 245 major complications, for a rate of 0.2602%. Death associated with lipoplasty performed as an isolated procedure was rare; the mortality rate was 0.0021%, or 1 per 47,415 procedures. Stated positively, the estimated non-mortality probability is 99.98%. When lipoplasty was performed with other procedures, excluding abdominoplasty, the rate was 0.0137%, or 1 per 7314 procedures. When lipoplasty was combined with abdominoplasty, with or without other procedures, the rate was 0.0305%, or 1 per 3281 procedures—a rate 14 times greater than that for lipoplasty only. Nearly 33% of respondents said that they had modified their approach to lipoplasty and/or their approach to patient selection within the last 24 months in accordance with published recommendations of the Lipoplasty Task Force.

Conclusions: The ASAPS survey documents the current safety of lipoplasty when it is performed as an isolated procedure by properly trained surgical specialists adhering to recommended standards of clinical practice. Further studies are needed to examine the factors that increase the risk in combined procedures as well as the effectiveness of prophylactic measures in avoiding complications.

According to statistics compiled by the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS),1 the number of cosmetic procedures nationwide increased 119% between 1997 and 1999; for lipoplasty, the most frequently performed cosmetic surgery, the number increased 62%. During the same period, concern about the safety of lipoplasty was a frequent topic in the news media.

Current data are needed to help establish the actual rates of complications and mortality associated with lipoplasty. The author, as Chair of the ASAPS Body Contouring Committee, was asked by the Society to oversee implementation of a survey to gather information on the safety of lipoplasty as performed by its members. Although the inherent limitations of self-reported data on surgical complications and deaths were recognized, it was felt that a significant response from ASAPS members would provide meaningful data.

Background

In 1989, Teimourian and Rogers2 reported on a survey of complications from 112,756 body contouring procedures performed by 935 board-certified plastic surgeons from January 1984 to January 1988. These included 75,591 major lipoplasty procedures (distinguishing between “major” and “minor” lipoplasty was left to the subjectivity of the reporting surgeon). The authors concluded that major lipoplasty, with a mortality rate of 2.6 deaths per 100,000 procedures (0.0026%, or 1 per 38,462) was a safe operation. Comparative data on abdominoplasty, gathered as part of the same survey, showed a much higher mortality rate—41.4 deaths per 100,000 procedures (0.0414%, or 1 per 2,415). Combination procedures were not addressed by the survey.

In January 2000, Grazer and de Jong3 suggested that the risk of death associated with lipoplasty had escalated to 1 per 5224 procedures (0.0191%). Their article was based on a random survey reporting on 496,245 lipoplasty procedures performed from 1994 to mid 1998. Although the survey was sent to 1200 board-certified plastic surgeons who were members of ASAPS, the respondents were asked not only about any fatalities from lipoplasty that they had personally encountered but also about any such incidents that they had heard about in their communities; therefore, the results did not reflect the specific practices of ASAPS members. The survey was criticized for a method that could easily result in duplicate reporting of deaths.4

In addition, by the time the survey results were published, it was widely believed that educational efforts undertaken by the Lipoplasty Task Force involving several plastic surgery societies—ASAPS, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, and the Lipoplasty Society of North America—during the preceding 2 years had altered the way in which lipoplasty was being performed by board-certified plastic surgeons and significantly increased the level of patient safety. Corroborating this belief was a statement from the Medical Director of The Doctors’ Company, the nation’s largest malpractice insurer of board-certified plastic surgeons, that from October 1998 to the time of the ASAPS survey in September 2000 there were no claims of significant complications or death associated with any lipoplasty procedures performed by its more than 1000 insured board-certified surgeons.5

From 1998 to the present, ASAPS and other plastic surgery organizations have focused particular educational efforts on lipoplasty safety. In September 1998, after conducting its own survey, the Lipoplasty Task Force attempted to identify the most significant risk factors for lipoplasty. These were widely publicized to board-certified plastic surgeons, including all ASAPS members, through educational meetings, instructional courses, and publications. The Lipoplasty Task Force data and recommendations were highlighted by Rohrich and Beran6 in 1999. In 2000, ASAPS conducted the Survey on Office Surgery and Lipoplasty to gather current data on ASAPS members’ practices.

Materials and Methods

In September 2000, ASAPS sent out a 4-page questionnaire (“ASAPS Survey on Office Surgery and Lipoplasty”) to 1432 Active Members; 1398 of these members were certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS) and practiced within the United States, and the other 34 had certification in plastic surgery from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (considered the Canadian equivalent of ABPS certification). The median number of years in plastic surgery practice of the survey respondents was 20. A previous survey of the ASAPS membership had shown that 69% of the average member’s practice is devoted to aesthetic (cosmetic) surgery.7

The primary goals of the survey were to:

assess rates of morbidity and mortality associated with lipoplasty procedures performed by ASAPS members from September 1, 1998, through August 31, 2000, and

determine whether ASAPS members have significantly changed any aspects of their approach to patient evaluation for lipoplasty or lipoplasty since September 1998, when physician education by plastic surgery organizations concerning lipoplasty risk factors was sharply accelerated.

The survey included questions to determine the percentage of ASAPS members who currently operated in surgical facilities that were (1) accredited by a national or state-recognized accrediting agency/organization, (2) state-licensed, and/or (3) Medicare-certified under Title XVIII. In addition, survey questions were developed to determine the percentage of ASAPS members, among those whose surgical facilities did not meet one or more of those criteria, who were planning to seek facility accreditation, licensure, or certification in the near future. This information was important in the light of the Joint Policy Statement on Accreditation of Non-Hospital Surgery Facilities,8 approved by the ASAPS Board of Directors on February 19, 2000; the statement called for each ASAPS member to perform all plastic surgery procedures involving anesthesia (other than minor local anesthesia and/or minimal oral tranquilization) only in surgical facilities meeting at least one of the criteria. The policy statement included a 3-year phase-in period with a deadline of July 1, 2002.

An independent research firm in Columbus, Ohio, conducted the survey mailing using address labels for ASAPS Active Members that had been provided by the Society.

Completed surveys, which were anonymous, were mailed directly to the firm by respondents. After the collation of data, a statistical analysis was conducted by an independent statistician affiliated with New York University.

Results

A total of 754 questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of 53%. The tabulated surveys showed that respondents performed a total of 439,132 cosmetic surgical procedures from September 1, 1998, through August 31, 2000; the average was 302 procedures per year per surgeon. These data are comparable to those obtained in other studies.1,9 In all, 61.4% of the procedures were performed in office-based surgical facilities. Among ASAPS respondents operating in office-based facilities, 65.2% said that their facility was state-licensed, Medicare-certified under Title XVIII, or accredited by a national or state-recognized accrediting organization (Table 1). However, 95.1% of responding ASAPS members provided answers indicating that they either were already in compliance or planned to be in compliance with the Joint Policy Statement requiring surgical facility accreditation, licensure, or certification by July 2002.

Of those respondents who indicated that they would not seek facility accreditation, a significant number said that they performed only minor procedures in the office-based unit or that they planned to switch to another facility. As was to be expected, given that all respondents were board-certified in plastic surgery, virtually all (97.8%) indicated that they had hospital privileges for the procedures that they performed in an office-based setting.

Lipoplasty morbidity

ASAPS members reported specifically on a total of 94,159 lipoplasty procedures. In all, 66% of the total number of lipoplasty procedures were lipoplasty only; 20% were lipoplasty without abdominoplasty but with one or more other procedures; and 14% involved lipoplasty with abdominoplasty, with or without any other procedures. The most frequently reported postoperative event was nausea/vomiting (1.02%, or 1 per 98 procedures). The most frequently reported nonfatal major complication was skin slough (0.0903%, or 1 per 1107 procedures). In all, there were 245 major nonfatal complications in the 94,159 reported procedures. This number compares favorably with the 175 significant complications in 24,295 lipoplasty procedures reported by the Lipoplasty Task Force.10 With regard to our survey, nonfatal complications and their frequencies are listed in Table 2.

Nonfatal complications from lipoplasty and lipoplasty combination procedures

Lipoplasty mortality

Death associated with lipoplasty performed as an isolated procedure was rare; the mortality rate was 0.0021%, or 1 per 47,415 procedures. Stated positively, the estimated non-mortality probability is 99.98%. When lipoplasty was performed with other procedures, excluding abdominoplasty, the mortality rate was 0.0137%, or 1 per 7314 procedures. When lipoplasty was combined with abdominoplasty, with or without other procedures, the mortality rate was 0.0305%, or 1 per 3281 procedures (Table 3). It is noteworthy that in our survey, the mortality rate for lipoplasty combined with abdomino-plasty is comparable to, but lower than, the mortality rate for abdominoplasty alone (0.0414%, or 1 per 2415 procedures) that was reported in 1989 by Teimourian and Rogers.2

Discussion

Data from this survey suggest that significant progress has been made in improving patient safety in cosmetic surgery. First, the percentage of ASAPS members operating in office-based surgical facilities that are accredited, state-licensed, or Medicare-certified is substantial and increasing. Second, the survey findings suggest that lipo-plasty research and educational efforts have begun to yield measurable results.

Mortality rate for 94,159 lipoplasty procedures performed by ASAPS members: Sept 1, 1998, through Aug 31, 2000

Changes to lipoplasty technique or patient evaluation, since September 1998, by 32.7% of ASAPS respondents who reported making modifications

The Lipoplasty Task Force, in 1998, reported on data from lipoplasty procedures performed by board-certified plastic surgeons (however, not exclusively by ASAPS members) and presented a mortality rate of 0.02%, or 1 death per 5000 lipoplasty surgeries.10 As a result of these findings, the Lipoplasty Task Force emphasized to plastic surgeons that performing multiple unrelated procedures at the same time was among several factors that appeared to increase lipoplasty risks.

The data obtained from the current ASAPS survey underscore this risk more directly than those from any previous survey. At the same time, however, the mortality rate of 1 per 47,415 procedures when lipoplasty is performed as an isolated procedure presents a strong case for lipoplas-ty safety. The survey confirms that when other procedures are performed with lipoplasty, the risks increase; the specific combination of lipoplasty and abdominoplas-ty presents the greatest risk.

Likelihood of denying surgery to a prospective lipoplasty patient

Effect of excess body weight on denial of surgery

Significantly from the standpoint of increased patient safety, nearly one third (32.7%) of ASAPS respondents said that they had modified their lipoplasty practice within the 24 months of the survey period (Table 4). Of those indicating that they had made changes, the most frequent modification was that they were less likely to perform lipoplasty in combination with certain other procedures. Almost as common, however, were using stricter patient selection criteria, limiting the length of surgery, and removing a smaller volume of fat.

Proper patient selection is always of utmost importance in the safety of cosmetic surgery. ASAPS members responding to the survey indicated that there were many situations in which they were likely to decide against performing lipoplasty on particular patients because of concerns about safety or for other reasons (Table 5).

Volumes of supernatant fat removed per patient

In 1998, the Lipoplasty Task Force cited poor patient health as a significant risk factor in lipoplasty.6 Virtually all responding ASAPS surgeons (98.4%) said that they would be likely to deny lipoplasty surgery to an individual with a serious medical problem. Interestingly, however, almost as many (97.9%) said that they would be unlikely to perform surgery on a prospective patient who had unrealistic expectations. Other groups of patients on whom a majority of respondents said that they would probably be unwilling to perform lipoplasty included (1) patients with inadequate skin tone who were unwilling to undergo necessary skin tightening procedures (78.4%), (2) patients who were significantly above their ideal body weight (68.3%), and (3) patients with histories of alcohol or drug abuse (65.4% of respondents; Tables 5 and 6). Nearly half (45.9%) of the respondents said that they would be likely to deny lipoplasty surgery to a heavy smoker.

The Lipoplasty Task Force report suggested that excessive amounts of fluid and local anesthesia were other factors that can increase the surgical risk associated with lipoplasty.6 The current ASAPS survey results show that 98% of respondents were using a wetting solution-to-aspirate volume of 2:1 or less.

The final risk factor cited by the Lipoplasty Task Force was excessive removal of fat.6 In the 24 months of the study, most (54.3%) of the lipoplasty procedures reported involved removal of 2500 cc or less of supernatant fat. Only 5.4% of patients underwent so-called “large-volume” lipoplasty, in which more than 5000 cc of supernatant fat is removed (Table 7).

Conclusions

The ASAPS survey documents the current safety of lipoplasty when it is performed as an isolated procedure by a properly trained surgical specialist adhering to recommended standards of clinical practice.

Surgeons and their patients must carefully consider both the benefits and the risks of combining lipoplasty with other procedures, realizing that the risk of complications increases substantially when multiple procedures are performed. Antiembolism measures should be implemented routinely. Compression devices to minimize the risk of deep vein thrombosis and embolus have recently been recommended for any procedure performed with the patient under general anesthesia and lasting longer than 1 hour.6 Proper patient selection, good clinical judgment in anesthesia technique, and prudent postsurgical monitoring are also necessary to achieve maximum patient safety.

Safety measures include using properly equipped facilities with appropriate procedures in place for handling emergencies. In addition to mandatory accreditation of office-based surgical facilities, there should be mandatory reporting of all untoward events associated with cosmetic surgery. Such records, as well as the requirement of appropriate credentials for physicians in the office-based surgical environment, ultimately will help to improve standards of care and make surgery safer for all patients undergoing cosmetic procedures.


can breast reduction cause cancer

What are the risks of breast reduction surgery?

The decision to have breast reduction surgery is extremely personal. You will have to decide if the benefits will achieve your goals and if the risks of breast reduction surgery and potential complications are acceptable.

Your plastic surgeon and/or plastic surgery staff will explain in detail the risks associated with surgery. You will be asked to sign consent forms to ensure that you fully understand the procedure you will undergo and any risks or potential complications.

Possible breast reduction surgery risks include:

The practice of medicine and surgery is not an exact science. Although good results are expected, there is no guarantee. In some situations, it may not be possible to achieve optimal results with a single breast reduction procedure and another surgery may be necessary.

Where will my surgery be performed?

Breast reduction procedures may be performed in your plastic surgeon’s accredited office-based surgical facility, an ambulatory surgical facility or a hospital. Your plastic surgeon and the assisting staff will fully attend to your comfort and safety.

When you go home

If you experience shortness of breath, chest pains or unusual heartbeats, seek medical attention immediately. Should any of these breast reduction complications occur, you may require hospitalization and additional treatment.

The practice of medicine and surgery is not an exact science. Although good results are expected, there is no guarantee. In some situations, it may not be possible to achieve optimal results with a single surgical procedure and another surgery may be necessary.

Be careful

Following your physician’s instructions is key to the success of your surgery. It is important that the surgical incisions are not subjected to excessive force, abrasion or motion during the time of healing. Your doctor will give you specific instructions on how to care for yourself and minimize breast reduction surgery risks.

Be sure to ask questions: It’s very important to address all your questions directly with your plastic surgeon. It is natural to feel some anxiety, whether excitement for the anticipated outcome or preoperative stress. Discuss these feelings with your plastic surgeon.

common problems after breast reduction surgery

What are the risks of breast reduction surgery?

The decision to have breast reduction surgery is extremely personal. You will have to decide if the benefits will achieve your goals and if the risks of breast reduction surgery and potential complications are acceptable.

Your plastic surgeon and/or plastic surgery staff will explain in detail the risks associated with surgery. You will be asked to sign consent forms to ensure that you fully understand the procedure you will undergo and any risks or potential complications.

Possible breast reduction surgery risks include:

The practice of medicine and surgery is not an exact science. Although good results are expected, there is no guarantee. In some situations, it may not be possible to achieve optimal results with a single breast reduction procedure and another surgery may be necessary.

Where will my surgery be performed?

Breast reduction procedures may be performed in your plastic surgeon’s accredited office-based surgical facility, an ambulatory surgical facility or a hospital. Your plastic surgeon and the assisting staff will fully attend to your comfort and safety.

When you go home

If you experience shortness of breath, chest pains or unusual heartbeats, seek medical attention immediately. Should any of these breast reduction complications occur, you may require hospitalization and additional treatment.

The practice of medicine and surgery is not an exact science. Although good results are expected, there is no guarantee. In some situations, it may not be possible to achieve optimal results with a single surgical procedure and another surgery may be necessary.

Be careful

Following your physician’s instructions is key to the success of your surgery. It is important that the surgical incisions are not subjected to excessive force, abrasion or motion during the time of healing. Your doctor will give you specific instructions on how to care for yourself and minimize breast reduction surgery risks.

Be sure to ask questions: It’s very important to address all your questions directly with your plastic surgeon. It is natural to feel some anxiety, whether excitement for the anticipated outcome or preoperative stress. Discuss these feelings with your plastic surgeon.

how to lose belly fat after breast reduction

From weight to health to mood, oversized breasts create unnecessary heaviness. If your breasts are weighing you down, a breast reduction surgery could lighten up nearly every aspect of your life. Let the experts at Aesthetic Surgical Arts/Mia Bella Donna Medspa in Overland Park, KS, show you the way toward greater freedom with a mammaplasty.

What Is a Breast Reduction?

If you are living with large breasts, you already know how painful they can be. Sometimes it may feel like you are carrying the weight of the entire world on your shoulders. You may wonder why many women long for large breasts when yours have caused you great discomfort.

A breast reduction, or mammaplasty, is an operation to decrease your cup size. Although changing the size and weight of the breast is the most common reason women reduce their breast size, this surgery can also address breast positioning and shape. This empowering procedure helps women achieve optimal health with enduring, lifelong benefits.

Who Could Benefit From a Breast Reduction?

Any woman unhappy with their large breasts could benefit from reducing the size. Many women with enlarged breasts experience health problems that impact their daily lives. Women of all ages are eligible for this procedure.

Although many women recognize that their very large breasts cause their symptoms, many others don’t because they seem unrelated. Some problematic symptoms of oversized breasts include:

Chronic Pain

Ongoing pain in the neck, back, and shoulders are a fact of life for many women with big breasts. The breasts themselves can feel too heavy to carry. Your pain may range from mild to severe, but chronic pain is always a reason to contact your doctor.

Breathing Difficulties

Breast weight can impair your ability to breathe normally, and you may not even realize it. The excessive poundage on the ribs and diaphragm can make it more difficult for you to breathe deeply. Some women notice the effects more when lying on their backs.

Poor Posture

The weight of breasts takes a toll on your posture. All the yoga in the world may not be enough to keep your spine straight. Big breasts can put too much pressure on your frame, resulting in a curved posture. Years of bearing the weight could eventually lead to a spinal deformity if the chest and back muscles aren’t equipped to handle the load.

Low Self-Esteem

Your breasts can influence the way you feel about yourself. Whether you are struggling with pain, tired of never finding clothes that fit or receiving unwanted attention, you could be a candidate for this procedure. Although women with large breasts are the typical candidate for this procedure, we can help any woman who wants to reduce her cup size.

Grooved Shoulders

Finding a supportive bra for larger breasts has become easier in recent years, but finding the right strap to weight ratio is still a challenge. Large breasts need wide bra straps, but even wide straps sometimes aren’t enough. If your straps don’t support the weight of your breasts fully, it can lead to deep and painful grooves in the shoulders. After a time, these grooves can even cause scarring on your shoulders.

Rash or Infection Under the Breast

Weight isn’t the only cause for concern with big breasts: also common are rashes under the breasts. Large breasts trap in heat, moisture, and bacteria that can lead to rashes or other infections. A skin infection or rash almost always leads to some form of irritation or pain.

Migraines and Tension Headaches

Your breasts may cause migraines or tension headaches. Evidence suggests that women with large breasts have a dramatic reduction in head-pounding headaches after reducing the size of their breasts.

Tingling and Numbness

If you have tingling or numbness in your arms, fingers, or hands, your overly large breasts could cause it. Excessively large breasts combined with poor posture can obstruct the pathways of nerves to create that uncomfortable numbing or tingling feeling.

Trouble Exercising

If you struggle to exercise due to the size of your breasts, you aren’t alone. Many women with bigger cups sizes have a tough time getting the recommended amount of physical activity in the day-to-day. A sports bra can only go so far in protecting your sensitive tissue, and a breast reduction may be your best bet.

Will Losing Weight Reduce My Breast Size?

Many women experience a change in breast size when they lose weight. Breast tissue is primarily fat, which you can lose through diet and physical activity. However, not every woman can expect a significant reduction in breast size from exercise; therefore, it’s an unreliable method for reducing this area of the body.

Reducing Your Breast Size Helps You Lose Weight

Staying active and eating a well-balanced diet is the best way to safeguard your health. If you can’t engage in physical activity comfortably, reducing your breast size could have a two-fold effect. It removes the discomfort caused by your breasts and makes working out possible.

Will I Lose Weight After a Breast Reduction?

Yes, you will probably lose some weight after this procedure because you are removing fat from your body. The amount of weight you’ll lose depends on how much tissue you remove with surgery. However, you shouldn’t expect your operation to tip the scales. Even the largest breasts only weigh only a few pounds per breast.

One of the most significant advantages of weight loss after breast reduction surgery. Most women report feeling much more capable of exercising and maintaining their weight after the operation. It’s common for women to lose between 10 and 20 pounds in the months following surgery. This weight loss is a combination of the ability to partake in physical activity, and the motivation resulting from a woman enjoying her new physique.

You’ll Look Like You Lost Weight

One disadvantage of having large breasts is how it skews your proportions. Many women who have disproportionately large breasts look like they weigh more than they do. A benefit of reducing breast size is that it seems like you’ve lost a lot of weight, even when you haven’t.

This effect is especially marked in women who have a smaller frame and a bigger bust. Many women report others commenting on how much slimmer and taller they look after reduction surgery. Even though you won’t lose substantial weight from removing breast tissue, you will probably look like you have.

Should I Lose Weight Before a Breast Reduction Procedure?

If you are not at your target weight, it’s a good idea to lose weight before your procedure. If you have your reduction before losing weight, it could impact the results of your surgery. Losing a lot of weight after a reduction operation could result in you having smaller breasts than you want. It may also cause changes to the skin changes and the overall shape of the breasts.

Your best bet is to achieve your desired weight and maintain it for a few months before scheduling your appointment to reduce your breast size.

Things to Know

Before undergoing this life-changing operation, it’s essential to know what to expect. Although no two women are exactly alike, there are several results women commonly share after reducing their breast size.

Our Premier Johnson County Facility

Skip the hospital: your procedure takes place in our state-of-the-art Johnson County facility. We carefully remove the unwanted fat, tissue, and skin from your breasts to reduce the size. We reshape them to your desired firmness and roundness all in the comfort of our pristine surgical facility and Medspa.

Loving the Results

This surgery has one of the highest patient satisfaction rates immediately and after ten years post-op. According to studies, 95% of women feel extremely satisfied with the results of removing breast tissue. The reason for these rave reviews is simple: this operation treats all the painful symptoms associated with bigger breasts.

Your quality of life is bound to improve when you remove chronic pain from your life. You can say goodbye to back, neck, and shoulder pain while breathing more deeply every day. Your entire world opens up with opportunities and possibilities that you may never have considered before.

An Outpatient Procedure

We usually perform this safe procedure on an outpatient basis under general anesthesia. In only a few hours, your surgeon transforms your bust to more manageable proportions, and you typically won’t have to stay in a hospital for days after the operation.

You Can’t Choose Your Cup Size

This aspect may sound concerning to you, but it makes sense when you put everything into perspective. Bra sizes vary from one company to another, and there isn’t a universal standard for cup sizes. Although you are probably accustomed to identifying your breast size with a letter, it’s more useful to think about how you want your breasts to look after surgery.

During your consultation, your surgeon will discuss your breast goals with you to understand what you want the result to be. Together you find a size that works for you and your body. Also, keep in mind that the results immediately after surgery may not be what you had in mind. It takes a little time for your breasts to settle into their new size and shape.


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