Cosmetic Surgery Tips

Does botox for migraines help wrinkles

If you’re one of the 1 billion people worldwide who suffers from migraines, you’re probably familiar with the throbbing pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light that can last for hours or days. As if that weren’t enough, it turns out there’s another thing to worry about: wrinkles.

Migraine sufferers often have a high concentration of nerve fibers in their faces—think of them like power cords for pain—which means that when a migraine hits, your face is going to be one of the first places it shows up. The constant tension and pain in your face means that your skin is always working to compensate by tensing up, which leads to wrinkles.

Is there any good news? Yes! It turns out that Botox can help with both migraines and wrinkles.

You may find it hard to access the right information on the internet, so we are here to help you in the following article, providing the best and updated information on Does botox for migraines help wrinkles, botox for migraines before and after pictures. Read on to learn more. We at collegelearners have all the information that you need about where is botox injected for migraines. Read on to learn more.

Does botox for migraines help wrinkles

  • Botox is used as a therapeutic treatment for many conditions, including for prevention of migraine headaches, and Botox Cosmetic is used for aesthetic purposes to lessen wrinkles like crow’s feet or forehead lines.
  • Botox and Botox Cosmetic are prescription medicines that both contain the active ingredient onabotulinumtoxinA, but they come as separate products.
  • Originally when Botox was first approved for wrinkles, doctors found it all also helped patients with migraine headaches. It was eventually approved by the FDA for migraine prevention in 2010.
  • Both treatments are given as injections into the muscles of the face, neck or head, depending upon the use. You will need more injections per session for migraine prevention than for wrinkle treatment.
  • Botox (for the treatment of chronic migraine) and Botox Cosmetic are for use in adults only.

In addition to prevention of chronic migraine headache in adults, Botox is also approved to treat:

  • overactive bladder
  • leakage of urine (incontinence) in adults with overactive bladder due to neurologic disease
  • muscle spasticity
  • cervical dystonia (abnormal head position and neck pain)
  • certain types of eye muscle problems or eyelid spasms
  • severe underarm sweating

Botox Cosmetic is approved for adults to temporarily help improve the look of moderate to severe facial wrinkles:

  • forehead lines
  • crow’s feet lines
  • frown lines between the eyebrows.

Botox Cosmetic is supplied in different unit vial sizes from Botox.

  • Botox used for migraine comes in 100 and 200 unit single-use vials, while Botox Cosmetic for wrinkles comes in 50 and 100 unit single-use vials.
  • Reconstitution and dilution instructions in the package insert vary between these two products.
  • Potency Units of Botox Cosmetic or Botox are not interchangeable with other preparations of botulinum toxin products.

Botox dose for migraine: The recommended total dose for chronic migraine is 155 Units, as 0.1 mL (5 Units) injections per each site divided across 7 head/neck muscle areas, for a total of 31 individual injections. These areas include the forehead, bridge of the nose, the temples, the neck, the back of the head, and just above the shoulder blades in your upper back.

Botox Cosmetic dose for wrinkles: The recommended dose for wrinkles varies based on wrinkle type and typically ranges from 20 to 24 units per wrinkle area. The units per injection site will vary by patient and can be determined by a qualified injector for optimal results.

Can I get Botox and Botox Cosmetic at the same time?

Yes, you can receive Botox and Botox Cosmetic for different uses at the same time as long as the total dose received of onabotulinumtoxinA does not exceed 400 Units administered in a 3 month period for adults.

You may also receive Botox Cosmetic treatment for treatment of different wrinkle areas at the same time. It is not known if Botox Cosmetic is safe and effective for use more than once every 3 months.

The dilution and the resulting units per 0.1 mL (as noted in the package insert) are different between Botox and Botox Cosmetic. Health care providers should see the specific instructions for reconstitution and administration of each product.

Warnings: Botox and Botox Cosmetic may cause serious side effects that can happen hours, days, or weeks after an injection and can be life threatening. These include:

  • Problems breathing or swallowing
  • Spread of toxin effects (leading to symptoms of a serious condition called botulism)

Call your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of these problems after treatment.

According to the manufacturer, there has NOT been a confirmed serious case of spread of toxin effect away from the injection site when Botox has been used at the recommended dose to treat chronic migraine or when Botox Cosmetic has been used at the recommended dose to treat approved wrinkle areas.

What are Botox or Botox Cosmetic side effects?

  • dry mouth
  • discomfort or pain at the injection site
  • tiredness
  • headache
  • neck pain
  • eye problem
  • drooping eyebrow
  • urinary tract infection and painful urination
  • inability to empty your bladder
  • allergic reaction
  • upper respiratory tract infection

Review these warnings and side effects in this Medication Guide for Botox and Botox Cosmetic. Tell your doctor if you have a side effect that does not go away or that concerns you.

Bottom Line

  • Botox Cosmetic is used for aesthetic purposes for wrinkles and Botox is used as a therapeutic treatment for many medical conditions, including migraine headache prevention.
  • Botox Cosmetic and Botox come as separate products but are both prescription medicines that contain the active ingredient onabotulinumtoxinA.
  • The number of injections needed for migraine prevention are more than the number needed for wrinkle treatment.
  • Both products are given as injections into the muscles of the face, neck or head, depending upon the use. You can receive both products as long as the total amount does not exceed 400 Units administered in a 3 month period for adults.

This is not all the information you need to know about Botox or Botox Cosmetic for safe and effective use for migraine. Review the full Botox or Botox Cosmetic information here, and discuss this information and questions with your doctor or other healthcare provider.

where is botox injected for migraines

What is Botox?

Botox is used as a treatment for chronic migraine in the UK.

Botox (botulinum toxin type A) is a type of nerve toxin that paralyses muscles. It comes from a bacterium known as Clostridium botulinum. It was discovered as effective for people with chronic migraine while being used for cosmetics treatment. It was found that people who had Botox experienced fewer headaches.

When is Botox used?

Botox is approved for use on the NHS for the treatment of chronic migraine in adults. Chronic migraine is defined as having at least 15 headache days a month, with at least eight of those featuring migraine symptoms.

It is not an effective treatment for other types of headache including episodic migraine (headache on fewer than 15 days a month), tension-type headache and cluster headache.

Botulinum toxin is used to treat other conditions such as hemifacial spasm, cervical dystonia, cerebral palsy, bladder pain, lower back pain, neuropathic pain and stroke.

In England and Wales, the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends the use of Botox for people with chronic migraine who:

  • have failed at least three preventive treatments
  • have been appropriately managed for medication overuse headache

In Scotland, the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) approved Botox for chronic migraine where people have failed to respond to three oral preventive treatments and any medication overuse has been appropriately managed.

In Northern Ireland, the Department of Health endorsed the NICE appraisal approving Botox for chronic migraine in 2012.

How does Botox work?

It’s not clear why Botox is effective in migraine. However, doctors think it works by blocking chemicals called neurotransmitters that carry pain signals from within your brain.

Will it work for me?

Botox aims to reduce how often you have migraine attacks and how severe they are.

Most people have at least two treatment cycles before deciding if Botox is effective. A good response to Botoxis  usually a 30-50% reduction in how many headaches you have. Doctors will also consider any improvements in your quality of life. Some people notice an improvement in their quality of life with Botox even if they don’t have a big reduction in headache days.

How is Botox given?

The guidelines recommend Botox is given as a series of between 31 and 39 small injections. These are given under the skin or into the muscles in and around the head of the forehead, above the ears, and into the neck. The person doing your treatment will have been trained to provide Botox for chronic migraine.

Injections are given every 12 weeks. Botox is usually given until your migraine has changed to episodic migraine for three months in a row, or that there is significant improvement in disability using quality of life questionnaires. If Botox doesn’t improve your migraine enough it may be stopped.

What are the side effects of Botox?

Generally, Botox is well-tolerated. The most common side effects include neck pain, muscular weakness and drooping of the eyelid. These side effects are temporary because the treatment wears off over time.

How do I access Botox?

Botox is only available on the NHS for people with chronic migraine who have tried at least three other preventive treatments. It is currently only available via a specialist such as a headache specialist or consultant neurologist.

If you think you are eligible for Botox and would like to considered for treatment you can ask for a referral to a specialist. The specialist will assess your history and symptoms to make sure Botox is an appropriate treatment option for you. You should be asked to keep a headache diary to monitor the effectiveness of the treatment.

If Botox doesn’t work for you or stops working your specialist will discuss other treatment options with you.

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