Cosmetic Surgery Tips

Is collagen filler safe

Collagen injectable has been used in plastic surgery for years, but the use of collagen fillers remains controversial. Some doctors consider them safe and effective, while others have reservations. As with any product or procedure, healthcare providers should weigh their benefits against the risks before using them on patients.

You may find it hard to access the right information on the internet, so we are here to help you in the following article, providing the best and updated information on Is collagen filler safe , What You Should Know Before Getting Facial Fillers. Read on to learn more. We at cosmeticsurgerytips have all the information that you need about Nonsurgical Cosmetic Procedures: Before and After. Read on to learn more.

Is collagen filler safe

The injection of the collagen fillers is a safe procedure but only when it is performed by a licensed and experienced healthcare professional. Bellafill is the only FDA approved collagen filler available in the United States.

The injection of the collagen filler at sites, other than the face and the back of the hands is not backed by the FDA, and therefore, it is not recommended. It is unsafe to inject the collagen fillers at the other sites like the buttocks for the augmentation of the breast size or body contouring.

Self-injection of collagen products must never be attempted. The safety of collagen fillers in individuals below 18 years of age and pregnant or breastfeeding women is not yet established. The long-term safety of any collagen filler injection is unproven.

Improper collagen filler use can lead to long term pain, infections, scarring, and permanent disfigurement. Fatal side effects like the blockage of a blood vessel by a clot or onset of a stroke may also be seen.

Collagen injection may not be a safe procedure for you if:

What are collagen fillers?

Collagen is a natural body protein responsible for maintaining skin elasticity and firmness. After a particular age, the body stops producing collagen, and this makes you prone to the signs of aging like wrinkles and facial sagging.

Injecting collagen fillers into the skin is a quick fix to achieve a more youthful and radiant look at a fraction of the cost of a facelift. The collagen fillers may be safely used to correct moderate to deep facial wrinkles and folds along with the nose and lips.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved injecting collagen fillers in the face and back of the hand. These can be used to reduce crow’s feet around eyes, mouth, and forehead to reduce frown lines. It is also used for smoothing fine depressions over the face and reducing acne scars. It can plump up the lips, lift sunken cheeks, and smooth out wrinkles at the back of the hand.

Collagen injections (commercially known as Bellafill) is a cosmetic procedure done by injecting collagen, which is made up of bovine (cow) collagen, under your skin.

What are the side-effects of collagen filler?

The collagen fillers are derived from a cow protein. They also contain the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) beads and lidocaine, a local anesthetic to help make the procedure as painless as possible.

The main adverse effect of the filler is a reaction to cow protein or lidocaine; hence, a prior skin sensitivity test is a must.

Other adverse events to the collagen fillers (though rare) are:

  • Skin redness
  • Skin discomfort, including swelling, bleeding and bruising
  • Infection at the injection site
  • Skin rash with itching
  • Possible scarring
  • Bumps, especially if injected too superficially
  • Nerve injury and paralysis
  • Blindness if the injected is too close to the eyes
  • Shifting of the filler from the desired site
  • Skin necrosis (death) and skin sores

Overall, the procedure is safe if done in a proper setting. It is always prudent to discuss your expectations with your plastic surgeon before the procedure. The effects of the collagen fillers are temporary and may need subsequent touch-ups at intervals, depending on the injected site.

What You Should Know Before Getting Facial Fillers

Types of Facial Fillers

Several different types of synthetic fillers are available.

Synthetic gels are the most common facial fillers. There are different brands, but they’re grouped by the natural body substance they mimic. This includes calcium hydroxyapatite, and hyaluronic acid, a sugar protein that attracts water. Some are stiffer and puff up your skin more than others. Unlike other fillers, autologous fat injections call for surgery because they take fat from another part of your body.

Facial fillers involve a medical procedure. Schedule a consultation to check out the facility and ask questions. You’ll be more relaxed if your treatment is on a different day.

Each state has rules for who can give facial filler shots. Look for a board-certified plastic surgeon, dermatologist, or ophthalmologist. Ask:

  • How did you become experienced in facial fillers?
  • Are you qualified to take care of any issues, no matter how rare?

Choose a Professional Setting

It is best to get facial fillers at a medical office.

Get facial fillers done at a medical office. Don’t do it at a party, salon, spa, or someone’s house. Issues are rare, but they can happen, especially with someone who doesn’t know what they’re doing.

Set a Goal

Have a goal in mind before getting facial fillers.

Think hard about what you want fillers to do for your face — it’s not just about looking younger. You might want to get injections in stages so you can better direct the result. Ask your doctor for before-and-after photos. It’s important to know what success looks like.

Common Problems

It is normal to have bruising, redness, mild bleeding, and discomfort after getting fillers.

Your face is a road map of arteries and veins underneath your skin. Bruising after an injection is normal. So are redness, mild bleeding, and discomfort. You’ll probably be a little swollen at first, too. Give it a week to settle in.

Other Risks

Fillers may be associated with risks like rash, acne, lumps, allergic reaction, and infection.

Even though most fillers copy natural substances already in your body, your body may not like it. Other risks include:

  • Rash
  • Acne
  • Lumps
  • An itchy allergic reaction
  • An infection that feels warm to the touch

Inflammation may also make your skin darker, called hyperpigmentation. This can happen with all skin types, but it’s most often seen in patients of color.

Rare Side Effects

Rare side effects of fillers include dead tissue and blindness.

Dead tissue and blindness don’t happen very often. In each case, fillers block arteries and blood can’t get through. For both conditions, you’ll need help from a dermatologist or other medical professional right away.

Not A Cure-All

Fillers add volume to your face, but cannot correct other issues.

Facial fillers can add volume to your face, but they can’t change the quality of your skin. Talk to your dermatologist about treatment options if you have deep acne scars, etched-in lines, brown patches, or other skin issues.

What’s the Cost?

Fillers cost approximately $650 per syringe for a 1-year treatment and $900 per syringe for treatment that lasts 2 years.

You’ll need one or two syringes, depending on your treatment area. Current average cost is $650 per syringe for a 1-year filler and $900 for one that lasts 2 years. Most fillers aren’t covered by health insurance because they’re considered cosmetic. If someone quotes you a price that seems too good to be true, the filler may come from an illegal source.

Blood Thinners

Tell your doctor if you are taking blood thinners before getting fillers.

Tell your doctor about any medications you take, including supplements. Anything that thins your blood, like prescription drugs, aspirin, or ibuprofen, can make bruises last longer. Most doctors say you should stop blood thinners 2 weeks before an injection.

Don’t Wear Makeup

Do not wear makeup before you get fillers and for about an hour or so afterwards.

To lower your risk of infection, make sure your face is clean when you show up for your appointment. Your doctor will clean it again before your injection. You may have to wait an hour or so after the procedure to put on makeup. When you do, use clean brushes and new cosmetics.

Nonsurgical Cosmetic Procedures: Before and After

Mirror, Mirror on the Wall

Cosmetic medicine has developed several nonsurgical procedures that can camouflage the effects of sun exposure and the passing of time.

Stopping the aging process and living eternally has been an enduring human desire, sought by Egyptian pharaohs, Chinese emperors, and Ponce de Leon’s search for the Fountain of Youth. Cosmetic medicine has developed several nonsurgical procedures that can camouflage the effects of sun exposure and the passing of time.

Botox Basics

Three different forms of botulinum toxin are available (Botox Cosmetic, Dysport, and Xeomin) for the injection of facial muscles.

Three different forms of botulinum toxin are available (Botox Cosmetic, Dysport, and Xeomin) for the injection of facial muscles. This bacterial protein temporarily paralyzes the muscle that receives the injection. Certain types of wrinkles, such as those on the forehead and at the corners of the eyes, diminish if the muscles producing them cannot contract normally. A thin needle and a small volume of toxin minimize the pain of the injection.

Botox: Before and After

The paralysis lasts about four months so patients must receive injections at regular intervals for maintenance.

After toxin injection, there is a gradual loss of muscular control, which usually takes up to a week to reach maximum effect; the areas of the affected face appear calm and unexpressive. The paralysis lasts about four months so patients must receive injections at regular intervals for maintenance.

Chemical Peel Basics

Chemical peels use a variety of substances to damage the skin in order to exfoliate the outer layers.

Chemical peels use a variety of substances to damage the skin in order to exfoliate the outer layers. The depth of the peel depends on the type of chemical, its concentration, and the length of time it remains on the skin. Glycolic acid, lactic acid, salicylic acid, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and phenol are some of the chemicals used in cosmetic peels. There is an improvement over the skin’s pre-peel state after the skin heals.

Chemical Peel: Before and After

Mild peels may be repeated every few weeks for the desired effect.

Mild peels may be repeated every few weeks for the desired effect. Deeper peels may cause some initial discomfort as well as swelling and crusting of the face. Moderate or deep facial peels can be repeated at 6- to 12-month intervals. It is important for patients to choose a physician who has plenty of experience with the chosen procedure, since the results of chemical peels are technique dependent. The doctor will be able to choose the best approach for the particular cosmetic issue.

Microdermabrasion Basics

Microdermabrasion is a procedure whereby silicon crystals (grains of sand) are propelled by air onto the skin surface, producing a small amount of inflammation.

Microdermabrasion is a procedure whereby silicon crystals (grains of sand) are propelled by air onto the skin surface, producing a small amount of inflammation. The minimal swelling produced by this technique can improve the appearance of superficial wrinkles. The results are modest, temporary, and must be repeated at frequent intervals. On the other hand, there are few side effects.

Microdermabrasion: After

A woman after a microdermabrasion treatment.

The irritation produced by microdermabrasion initially looks like a sunburn and feels tight, but this effect goes away within one day. Multiple treatments may be necessary.

Thermage Basics

Radio waves can improve the appearance of sun-damaged skin.

Radio waves can improve the appearance of sun-damaged skin. It is believed that either changes produced by directly heating skin collagen produces tightening of loosened skin, or new collagen synthesized after heating is responsible for the improvement, or both. Devices (for example, Thermage) used to generate the radio energy can produce enough heat in the skin to be painful, but a single treatment is all that is generally needed.

Thermage: Before and After – Eyelids

Droopiness of the eyelids is one condition often treated by Thermage.

Droopiness of the eyelids is one condition often treated by Thermage. Results are not visible until four to six months after the procedure.

Nonablative Laser (Fraxel) Basics

The idea of nonablative lasers like Fraxel is to protect the outer layers of the skin (the epidermis) while damaging only the deeper dermis.

The idea of nonablative lasers like Fraxel is to protect the outer layers of the skin (the epidermis) while damaging only the deeper dermis. Topical anesthetic reduces the pain associated with the procedure. Since the surface layers are preserved while the deeper layers of the skin sustain the damage, scarring is unlikely to occur, and new collagen is generated.

Nonablative Laser: Before and After

One of the advantages of nonablative laser therapy is that it does not require significant time away from work or daily activities.

One of the advantages of nonablative laser therapy is that it does not require significant time away from work or daily activities. The skin may be mildly reddened after the treatment, but this quickly improves. Most people undergo four to six treatments over a period of several months.

Nonablative Laser for Melasma

The doctor will determine the best treatment depending on the patient's skin color, the extent of discoloration, and their experience.

The use of lasers is just one of many approaches to the treatment of brown spots or patches, including “pregnancy mask” (melasma). The doctor will determine the best treatment depending on the patient’s skin color, the extent of discoloration, and their experience.

Diode Laser Basics

Diode laser is a technique that can achieve improvements by destroying oil-producing glands for those with severe acne.

Diode laser is a technique that can achieve improvements by destroying oil-producing glands for those with severe acne. Similar to Fraxel laser therapy, diode lasers penetrate below the surface layer of skin without damaging the outermost layer. Side effects are temporary and include redness and inflammation.

Diode Laser: Before and After

Diode laser therapy for acne may require several treatments.

Diode laser therapy for acne may require several treatments. This image shows skin that has improved after a series of five diode laser treatments.

Intense Pulse Light (IPL)

Intense pulsed light (IPL) technology exposes human tissues to broad spectrum (non-laser) light sources that produce enough heat to destroy colored molecules that can absorb the light.

Intense pulsed light (IPL) technology exposes human tissues to broad spectrum (non-laser) light sources that produce enough heat to destroy colored molecules that can absorb the light. In the case of human tissue, this involves melanin (skin pigment) and hemoglobin (blood pigment). When used appropriately on aged or pigmented skin, IPL can improve the skin’s appearance.

IPL: Before and After

Since IPL relies upon the absorption by hemoglobin and melanin, it can work on skin discolorations that are red or brown.

Since IPL relies upon the absorption by hemoglobin and melanin, it can work on skin discolorations that are red or brown. It may be effective in patients with dark spots (melasma), redness (rosacea), dilated blood vessels (telangiectasia), and aged skin. IPL also stimulates the production of collagen.

Cosmetic Filler Basics

Cosmetic fillers add substance to skin in order to lift up areas that are sinking.

Cosmetic fillers add substance to skin in order to lift up areas that are sinking. Certain wrinkles, depressed scars, and hollows can be camouflaged using this technique. The substances that have been used are varied and include one’s own fat or fibroblasts, poly-L-lactic acid, hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxyapatite, polymethylmethacrylate beads, and even silicone. Some of these substances produce improvement by enhancing collagen in the area injected, which adds volume to the tissue beneath the skin, and helps smooth the appearance of lines or wrinkles.

Cosmetic Filler: Before and After

Many, but not all, fillers disappear over a period of months, so it is necessary to reinject them to retain the desired appearance.

Many, but not all, fillers disappear over a period of months, so it is necessary to reinject them to retain the desired appearance. The benefit of this is if too much of the filler is injected, producing an undesirable puffiness to the tissue, this swelling will diminish over a period of months. On the other hand, repeated treatments are needed to maintain the desired look. Injection with fat cells often yields permanent results. Polymethylmethacrylate is another filler that produces permanent results.

Cosmetic Filler: Beyond Wrinkles

The anatomy of the aging face is now better understood than in the past.

The anatomy of the aging face is now better understood than in the past. Aside from increased wrinkling, there is a loss of fat in the cheeks and temples, and an increase in fat in the neck. As shown in this photograph, a filler has been used to plump a woman’s sunken cheek area.

Cosmetic Filler for Dark Circles: Before and After

Physicians may use fillers in the hollow area around the eye socket to minimize dark circles and bags under the eyes.

Physicians may use fillers in the hollow area around the eye socket to minimize dark circles and bags under the eyes.

Cosmetic Filler for Lips: Before and After

Health-care professionals may use the same fillers that plump wrinkles and minimize dark circles to plump the lips.

Health-care professionals may use the same fillers that plump wrinkles and minimize dark circles to plump the lips. Fat-cell injections may have permanent results, but collagen and hyaluronic acid fillers produce a temporary effect.

Making the Decision

The perception that nonsurgical cosmetic procedures are less risky than conventional scalpel surgery is not entirely accurate.

The perception that nonsurgical cosmetic procedures are less risky than conventional scalpel surgery is not entirely accurate. The choice of the best procedure requires careful consideration by both the patient and physician. It is important for the patient to have realistic expectations regarding the outcome.

Be very careful in choosing who you will trust to do any cosmetic work on your face (or on any part of your body). Your primary care doctor and/ or friends that have had a good outcome by an experienced caregiver are potential sources to help choose the best qualified person to do such procedures.

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