Cosmetic Surgery Tips

Laser for blue eyes

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to have blue eyes? Maybe you think that the color of your eyes is just fine. Maybe you don’t care about the color at all. But maybe, just maybe, there’s a part of you that has always wanted to be able to see the world through a pair of bright blue peepers. If this sounds familiar, then we’ve got good news for you: we can help!

Laser eye surgery is one of the most popular procedures in America today, and it’s not hard to see why. With our laser eye surgery services, we can give you blue eyes without any damage to your corneas or other parts of your body. We will remove any excess melanin from your eyes so that they take on their new brilliant hue! If you’re ready to have blue eyes but aren’t sure if laser surgery is right for you, check out our website today! You’ll find information about our process and pricing as well as testimonials from past clients who have had success with our procedure.

You may find it hard to access the right information on the internet, so we are here to help you in the following article, providing the best and updated information on Laser for blue eyes , laser treatment for blemishes cost. Read on to learn more.

Laser for blue eyes

Just 17% of the world's population has blue eyes, but why blue eyes are regarded as attractive is not known.  Theories range from evolutionary psychologists who say that blue-eyed women in Palaeolithic societies had a better chance of standing out in the crowd, others posit that pupil dilation -- a signifier of attraction -- is easier to see in lighter eyes.

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Just 17% of the world’s population has blue eyes, but why blue eyes are regarded as attractive is not known. Theories range from evolutionary psychologists who say that blue-eyed women in Palaeolithic societies had a better chance of standing out in the crowd, others posit that pupil dilation — a signifier of attraction — is easier to see in lighter eyes.

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PHOTOS:

From the piercing blue eyes of Paul Newman to the steely gaze of Daniel Craig, azure eyes have always been a measure of attractiveness. For the majority of the world’s population — an estimated 80% – those elusive movie star eyes can usually only be obtained with the aid of colored contact lenses.

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Lasik surgery, pictured above, is now a common procedure to correct sight disorders.The company says it has developed a laser treatment that disrupts the layer of pigment, causing the body to begin removing the tissue naturally. While the procedure takes all of 20 seconds, the blue eyes lurking underneath do not emerge for several weeks.

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The laser procedure works by eliminating the brown melanin that’s present in the anterior layers of the iris.
“The fundamental principle is that under every brown eye is a blue eye,” Dr Gregg Homer told CNN, adding that there is no actual blue pigmentation in the eye.

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Unlike Lasik surgery, pictured above, the patient would be able to undergo the whole procedure seated in a chair. Critics say the procedure may carry the risk of glaucoma, but the company says the particles released by the process are too small to create eye health problems.

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Just 17% of the world's population has blue eyes, but why blue eyes are regarded as attractive is not known.  Theories range from evolutionary psychologists who say that blue-eyed women in Palaeolithic societies had a better chance of standing out in the crowd, others posit that pupil dilation -- a signifier of attraction -- is easier to see in lighter eyes.

PHOTOS:

Just 17% of the world’s population has blue eyes, but why blue eyes are regarded as attractive is not known. Theories range from evolutionary psychologists who say that blue-eyed women in Palaeolithic societies had a better chance of standing out in the crowd, others posit that pupil dilation — a signifier of attraction — is easier to see in lighter eyes.

Hide Caption

1 of 5

PHOTOS:

From the piercing blue eyes of Paul Newman to the steely gaze of Daniel Craig, azure eyes have always been a measure of attractiveness. For the majority of the world’s population — an estimated 80% – those elusive movie star eyes can usually only be obtained with the aid of colored contact lenses.

Hide Caption

2 of 5

PHOTOS:

Lasik surgery, pictured above, is now a common procedure to correct sight disorders.The company says it has developed a laser treatment that disrupts the layer of pigment, causing the body to begin removing the tissue naturally. While the procedure takes all of 20 seconds, the blue eyes lurking underneath do not emerge for several weeks.

Hide Caption

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STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Blue eyes have long been associated with movie star good looks, but why they make hearts throb is open to conjecture
  • An estimated 17% of the world’s population has blue eyes. The color is an illusion created by light refracting in clear eyes
  •  Stroma Medical has developed a laser system that agitates the pigmentation in irises to reveal the clear blue eyes underneath
  • While the company says tests have shown the treatment to be safe, critics say that there may be a risk of developing glaucoma

(CNN)From the piercing blue eyes of Paul Newman to the steely gaze of Daniel Craig, blue eyes have always been a measure of attractiveness.

But exactly why they make hearts throb and catapult actors and models to stardom is a point of conjecture.

Theories range from evolutionary psychologists who say that blue-eyed women in Palaeolithic societies had a better chance of standing out in the crowd, others posit that pupil dilation — a signifier of attraction — is easier to see in lighter eyes.

Either way, just 17% of the world’s population has blue eyes.

For the majority of the world’s population — an estimated 80% – those elusive movie star eyes can usually only be obtained with the aid of colored contact lenses. But today there’s a medical procedure that can permanently turn your brown eyes blue.

Pioneered by Stroma Medical, the laser procedure works by eliminating the brown melanin that’s present in the anterior layers of the iris.

“The fundamental principle is that under every brown eye is a blue eye,” Dr Gregg Homer told CNN, adding that there is no actual blue pigmentation in the eye.

“The only difference between a brown eye and a blue eye is this very thin layer of pigment on the surface.

Bright like the sky

“If you take that pigment away, then the light can enter the stroma — the little fibers that look like bicycle spokes in a light eye – and when the light scatters it only reflects back the shortest wavelengths and that’s the blue end of the spectrum.”

He said the effect is similar to the Rayleigh scattering of sunlight in the sky — the physics that makes our sky appear blue.

The company says it has developed a laser treatment that disrupts the layer of pigment, causing the body to begin removing the tissue naturally. While the procedure takes all of 20 seconds, the blue eyes lurking underneath do not emerge for several weeks.

He said that Stroma Medical wanted to develop a procedure that was safer, cheaper and more convenient than any of the alternatives on the market.

Low intensity laser

While it has yet to get the green light from regulatory bodies in the United States, the company’s medical board has said that preliminary studies show the surgery is safe.

So far, just 17 patients in Mexico and 20 in Costa Rica have undergone the treatment.

“It’s difficult to work out a way to injure someone with this laser because the energy is so low,” he said.

The laser treats only the iris and does not enter the pupil or treat any portion of the inside of the eye where the nerves affecting the vision are located.

The company is still in the fundraising stage but hopes to have completed clinical trials within several years.

It’s not a goal of our company to promote blue eyes

GREGG HOMER

And the cost of turning your brown eyes blue?

Dr Homer says Stroma Medical would charge around $5,000 (£3,120) for the procedure.

Industry skepticism

Industry reaction to the process has been muted. Ophthalmologists who deal with people’s eyes, Homer concedes, have every right to be skeptical for the simple fact they are dealing with one of the most sensitive organs in the human body.

Saj Khan, an ophthalmologist at the London Eye Hospital, told CNN the treatment raised some red flags.

‘The main concern with any procedure that involves releasing pigment inside the eye is that the pigment can clog up the normal drainage channels which can in turn cause the pressure inside the eye to go up,” he said.

“If that happens significantly enough, for long enough, it’s how patients develop glaucoma.”

He said that while Stroma Medical claims that the particles released by the process are too fine to cause glaucoma — and that any complications were likely to be short-term and easily remedied – a risk still remains.

“Theory has some sense to it, but without seeing long-term outcomes and without seeing patients that have been treated in this way I wouldn’t commit myself to it,” Khan said.

Blue skies for blue eyes

In the meantime, Homer says there are no shortage of potential customers wanting to have the irreversible procedure.

“It’s not a goal of our company to promote blue eyes,” he said. “From my experience what most people are after is the translucence of the blue eye rather than the color of the blue eye.

“The people who seem most vigilant about pursuing this always have a story about being young and in the presence of a sibling or a friend who had light eyes and the friend is being told how beautiful their eyes are and it sticks with them.

“That seems to be something they’ve carried around with them. Would it be better for them to get over it? Probably.

“All your problems don’t go away because you’ve changed your eye color but I do believe that people like to express themselves a certain way and it’s nice when they have the freedom to do that.

Laser treatment for blemishes cost

There are various types of lasers used in these procedures

There are various types of lasers used in these procedures

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons in 2017, the average cost of laser skin resurfacing was $1,114-$2,124, which was average $2,071 in 2018. In 2019, the average cost of this procedure was $1,963 for ablatives and $1,201 for non-ablative. The cost varies widely depending on the type of procedure and areas of treatment.

Because laser skin resurfacing surgeries are not life-saving surgeries, there is no insurance coverage provided by the companies, except for the surgeries that are done to remove precancerous growth or modified scars on your skin.

The average cost does not include other related expenses. Therefore, you must consult your plastic surgeon and your insurance company before the procedure about payments. Most health insurance company plans do not provide coverage for cosmetic surgery or its complications. However, most plastic surgeons offer some payment options, so meet your plastic surgeon and determine your final cost.

The cost of laser skin resurfacing will vary based on the expertise, qualification of the plastic surgeon performing the procedure, the type of procedure, the time and effort required for that treatment, and the location of the office.

Generally, laser skin resurfacing procedure costs may include the following:

  • Hospital facility cost for surgery
  • Anesthesia fees
  • Medication prescription

Satisfaction involves more than a fee. Therefore, while choosing a plastic surgeon for this procedure, you must assure the surgeon’s experience and your comfort, which are the most important aspects as much as the cost.

What is skin resurfacing?

Laser resurfacing is a procedure that removes layers of the skin and improves its appearance or treats minor facial flaws such as blemishes or acne scars by using lasers.

There are various types of lasers used in these procedures such as:

  • Carbon dioxide (CO2): This type of laser is used to treat wrinkles, scars, and warts on your skin.
  • Erbium: It is used to remove superficial or moderately deep lines and wrinkles on your face, hands, neck, and chest. It has fewer side effects than CO2 lasers.
  • Pulsed-dye laser: These are non-ablative lasers that heat the skin and absorb pigments to reduce redness, hyperpigmentation, broken capillaries, and enlargement of facial blood vessels, giving rosacea (flushed appearance).
  • Fractional laser: It treats only the fraction of the skin in the area by breaking laser energy into thousands of tiny beams. It can be used in ablative or non-ablative procedures. It can be used to treat age-related blemishes.
  • Intense pulsed light (IPL): This treatment does not use a laser but uses a broad spectrum of light wavelength to treat pigmentations of the skin.

When should you have laser skin resurfacing?

You can ask for this procedure to a plastic surgeon if you have the following:

  • Acne scars
  • Age spots
  • Crow’s feet (wrinkle at the outer corner of your eye)
  • Sagged skin
  • Scars
  • Signs of sun damage to the skin
  • Wrinkles

What are the possible risks of laser skin resurfacing?

Risks include:

  • Pain
  • Reactivation of herpes sores over lips
  • Burning sensation
  • Burns
  • Itching
  • Swelling
  • Infection
  • Bleeding
  • Scarring
  • Increased risk of sun damage
  • Crusting of your skin
  • Pigmentation or discoloration of the skin
  • Bumps due to obstruction of the sweat glands

Laser treatment for face

photo of woman with smooth skin

If aging, acne, or too much time in the sun has left your face with blotches, scars, wrinkles, or lines, laser skin resurfacing may help your skin look younger and healthier.

Laser skin resurfacing removes skin layer by layer with precision. The new skin cells that form during healing give the skin a tighter, younger looking surface. The procedure can be done alone or with other cosmetic surgeries on the face.

Preparing for Laser Resurfacing

Start by consulting a plastic surgeon or dermatologist to find out if you’re a good candidate.

Tell your doctor if you get cold sores or fever blisters around your mouth. Laser skin resurfacing can trigger breakouts in people who are at risk.

If you decide to go ahead with laser skin resurfacing, your doctor will ask you to not take any medications or supplements — such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or vitamin E — that can affect clotting for 10 days before surgery.

If you smoke, you should stop for two weeks before and after the procedure. Smoking can prolong healing.

Your doctor may prescribe an antibiotic medication beforehand to prevent bacterial infections and also an antiviral medication if you are prone to cold sores or fever blisters.

What to Expect During and After the Procedure

Laser resurfacing is done by a plastic surgeon or dermatologist. It’s an outpatient procedure, meaning you’ll not have to stay overnight.

The doctor may treat wrinkles around your eyes, mouth, or forehead individually or treat your entire face. For small areas, the doctor will numb the areas to be treated with a local anesthetic and may also sedate you. You may require general anesthesia if your whole face is being treated.

Treating just parts of the face takes about 30 to 45 minutes. A full-face treatment takes up to two hours.

Following the laser procedure, the doctor will bandage the treated areas. After 24 hours, you will need to clean the treated areas four to five times a day and then apply an ointment such as petroleum jelly to prevent scabs from forming.

Swelling after laser skin resurfacing is normal. Your doctor may prescribe steroids to manage swelling around your eyes. Sleeping on an extra pillow at night can also ease swelling.

You may feel itching or stinging for 12 to 72 hours after the procedure. Five to seven days after laser resurfacing, your skin will become dry and peel.

Depending on the problem that was treated, healing typically takes 10 to 21 days. Once the skin heals, you can wear oil-free makeup to minimize redness, which usually fades in two to three months.

You will also probably notice that your skin is lighter for a while after surgery. It is particularly important that you use a “broad-spectrum” sunscreen, which screens ultraviolet B and ultraviolet A rays, to protect your skin during that time. When selecting a sunscreen, look for one specially formulated for use on the face with a 7% (or higher) zinc oxide content and a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear protective clothing, such as long-sleeved shirts, pants, and a wide-brimmed hat.Reapply your sunscreen every two hours when you are out, and more often if you are sweating or swimming.

It is also important to keep your new skin well moisturized. If you use Retin A or glycolic acid products, you should be able to start using them again after about six weeks or when the doctor says you can.

Benefits and Risks of Laser Resurfacing

Although skin resurfacing cannot produce perfect skin, it can improve the appearance of your skin. Potential risks of the procedure include:

  • Burns or other injuries from the laser’s heat
  • Scarring
  • Changes in the skin’s pigmentation, including areas of darker or lighter skin
  • Reactivating herpes cold sores
  • Bacterial infection

Cost of Laser Skin Resurfacing

The average cost for laser skin resurfacing was about $2509 for ablative and $1445 for non-ablative laser skin resurfacing in 2020, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. However, costs vary widely depending on where the procedure is being done.

Because laser skin resurfacing is considered a cosmetic procedure, most medical insurance companies will not cover it. There may be an exception if you get the procedure to modify scars or remove precancerous growths on your skin.

Talk with your doctor and your insurance company before the procedure about what the costs will be and what, if anything, insurance will pay for. Most doctors offer financing options.

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