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what to know about chemical peel pm

Chemical peels are a popular procedure in the beauty world, and they’re not going away anytime soon. When it comes to chemical peels, there are two types: superficial and medium depth. Superficial peels only affect the top layer of skin, while medium depth peels can go down to the middle layers of your complexion. Both can help improve your skin’s appearance by reducing fine lines, wrinkles, acne scars, and hyperpigmentation.

Chemical peels work by breaking down the bonds between dead skin cells so they can be easily washed away with exfoliation. This process helps to smooth out rough patches on your face and makes your complexion more even-toned overall.

You may find it hard to access the right information on the internet, so we are here to help you in the following article, providing the best and updated information on what to know about chemical peel pm , chemical peel or microneedling for acne. Read on to learn more. We at cosmeticsurgerytips have all the information that you need about microneedling and chemical peel same day. Read on to learn more.

what to know about chemical peel pm

photo of facial chemical peel

Chemical peels can improve the skin’s appearance. In this treatment, a chemical solution is applied to the skin, which makes it “blister” and eventually peel off. The new skin is usually smoother and less wrinkled than the old skin.

Chemical peels can be done on the face, neck, or hands. They can be used to:

  • Reduce fine lines under the eyes and around the mouth
  • Treat wrinkles caused by sun damage and aging
  • Improve the appearance of mild scars
  • Treat certain types of acne
  • Reduce age spots, freckles, and dark patches (melasma) due to pregnancy or taking birth control pills
  • Improve the look and feel of skin

Areas of sun damage may improve after chemical peeling.

After a chemical peel, skin is temporarily more sensitive to the sun, so wear sunscreen every day. It should say “broad-spectrum” on the label, meaning it protects against the sun’s UVA and UVB rays. Also, it should be a physical sunscreen and be above SPF 30. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., and wear a wide-brimmed hat.

Who Is a Good Candidate For a Chemical Peel?

Generally, fair-skinned and light-haired patients are better candidates for chemical peels. If you have darker skin, you may also have good results, depending upon the type of problem being treated. But you also may be more likely to have an uneven skin tone after the procedure.

Skin sags, bulges, and more severe wrinkles do not respond well to chemical peels. They may need other kinds of cosmetic surgical procedures, such as laser resurfacing, a facelift, brow lift, eyelid lift, or soft tissue filler (collagen or fat). A dermatologic surgeon can help determine the most appropriate type of treatment for you.

Before You Get a Chemical Peel

Tell your doctor if you have any history of scarring, cold sores that keep coming back, or facial X-rays.

Before you get a chemical peel, your doctor may ask you to stop taking certain drugs and prepare your skin by using other medications, such as Retin-A, Renova, or glycolic acid. The doctor may also prescribe antibiotics or antiviral drugs.

Work with your doctor to determine the depth of your peel. This decision depends upon the condition of your skin and your goals for treatment.

Ask your doctor in advance whether you will need to have someone drive you home after your peel.

How Chemical Peels Are Done

You can get a chemical peel in a doctor’s office or in a surgery center. It’s an outpatient procedure, meaning there’s no overnight stay.

The professional who does your peel will first clean your skin thoroughly. Then they will apply one or more chemical solutions — such as glycolic acid, trichloroacetic acid, salicylic acid, lactic acid, or carbolic acid (phenol) — to small areas of your skin. That creates a controlled wound, letting new skin take its place.

During a chemical peel, most people feel a burning sensation that lasts about five to ten minutes, followed by a stinging sensation. Putting cool compresses on the skin may ease that stinging. You may need pain medication during or after a deeper peel.

What To Expect After the Chemical Peel

Depending upon the type of chemical peel, a reaction similar to sunburn occurs following the procedure. Peeling usually involves redness followed by scaling that ends within three to seven days. Mild peels may be repeated at one to four-week intervals until you get the look you’re after.

Medium-depth and deep peeling may result in swelling as well as blisters that may break, crust, turn brown, and peel off over a period of seven to 14 days. Medium-depth peels may be repeated in six to 12 months, if necessary.

After treatment, you may need bandages for several days on part or all of the skin that was treated.

You’ll need to avoid the sun for several months after a chemical peel since your new skin will be fragile.

Possible Complications

Some skin types are more likely to develop a temporary or permanent color change in the skin after a chemical peel. Taking birth control pills, subsequent pregnancy, or a family history of brownish discoloration on the face may make that more likely.

There is a low risk of scarring in certain areas of the face. Some people may be more likely to scar. If scarring does happen, it can usually be treated with good results.

For people with a history of herpes outbreaks, there is a small risk of reactivating cold sores. Your doctor can prescribe medication to prevent or treat that.

Chemical peel or microneedling for acne

Chemical Peels vs. Microneedling

The years of active breakouts may be behind you, but breaking up with acne is hard to do. Pimples may disappear, but all too often they leave behind an unfriendly reminder of their visit — acne scars.

Acne scars detract from your overall complexion, making many adults feel self-conscious about the way they look. Acne scars are stubborn, and home remedies, like over-the-counter bleaching agents, won’t do the trick. The good news is that acne scars are now treatable.

At Dontage Premier Aesthetic Anti-Aging Specialists in Falls Church, Virginia, we understand the frustration acne scars bring. Skin care specialist Waseem Garbia, PA-C, and his medical team provide warm, personalized care that’s customized to meet your unique skin care needs.

If you’re like most people with acne scars, you’ve done your research and know two top treatments that work to reduce facial scarring are chemical peels and microneedling. But it’s hard to know which is better for acne scars.

Read on to understand the difference between chemical peels and microneedling, and figure out which is better for your acne scars.

WHAT IS A CHEMICAL PEEL?

A chemical peel resurfaces your skin through the use of a chemical solutions applied to the skin. As the chemicals react on your skin, they exfoliate the top layer, causing it to eventually peel off, leaving room for new, smoother skin to grow.

There are three basic types of chemical peel treatments, and each type has different effects and different time required to heal. The choice of peel depends on the results you’re seeking.

Superficial peels use a milder acid and generally work best on mild discoloration. Medium-level peels penetrate the outer and middle layers of skin to lessen the appearance of imperfections, such as age spots and wrinkles. Deep chemical peels penetrate far into the middle layers and remove damaged skin cells for more dramatic results.

Waseem and the team at Dontage will evaluate your skin to ensure you receive the best peel for your unique needs.

WHAT IS MICRONEEDLING?

Microneedling uses tiny needles to micro-puncture the skin. This nonsurgical procedure works by increasing collagen production in the punctured areas.

Collagen, a naturally-occurring protein made by the body, is the key ingredient in keeping your skin looking young, firm, and smooth. As we age, collagen production naturally declines. In addition, collagen production can be prematurely stunted when the skin is injured and then scarred, as with scars caused by acne.

Microneedling is safe to use on all skin types and is a safe and effective way to treat scars and other skin imperfections like wrinkles, sun spots, large pores, and more. Most patients find it to be pain free and experience dramatic results.

Microneedling isn’t a one-and-done treatment, however. Multiple treatments are generally required for optimal results. Waseem will evaluate your skin and recommend the right number of treatments for you. Most patients receive between 4-6 treatments, but each patient’s needs are different.

WHICH IS BETTER FOR ACNE SCARS?

Both chemical peels and microneedling will improve the appearance of your skin. Chemical peels generally work best on superficial imperfections, while microneedling penetrates deeper to improve more troublesome issues.

Many people with acne scars find a combination of microneedling and chemical peels deliver the best results. Microneedling will reach deeper under the skin to promote healing of scarred areas. Once the microneedling treatments are complete, a chemical peel can rejuvenate your skin further, leaving you with clearer, younger-looking skin.

No one treatment fits everyone’s needs. It’s important to meet with skincare professionals, like Waseem and the team at Dontage, to determine which is best for you.

HOW CAN I GET STARTED?

If you’re ready to say goodbye to your acne scars, be sure to seek treatment from certified professionals. With 16 years of professional experience, Waseem can recommend the right treatments to give you the clear, healthy skin you deserve.

Ready to take the first step in reducing the appearance of acne scars? Contact Waseem and the team at Dontage by phone or request an appointment online today.

Microneedling and chemical peel same day

Can you combine micro needling and chemical peels?

Acne is difficult to overcome. Even after the pimples have disappeared, scars often remain a bitter reminder that we once suffered from this affliction. These scars cause the skin to look uneven, which in turn can lead to many insecurities. Home remedies or whitening creams usually do not work, so it is necessary to resort to professional dermatological treatments. 

Professionals recommend treatments such as chemical peelings and micro-needling to eliminate these marks on the skin. These treatments are highly beneficial both in combination and separately. The question is, can you do a chemical peeling after micro-needling? Keep reading to find out, but first, we will explain both processes separately.


What is micro-needling, and how does it work?

Microneedling is a non-surgical procedure in which the skin receives small punctures with the help of a radiofrequency device with microscopic needles or tools like derma-rollers and derma-pens. This treatment is painless, and the micro-punctures heal almost instantly.  

In microneedling, the punctures are made at the superficial level of the skin to stimulate and raise collagen production and increase elasticity in those specific areas. That promotes rejuvenation and reduction of scars, expression lines, flaccidity, and sunspots, resulting in a firmer, smoother, and younger appearance.

This treatment works on all skin types safely and with optimal results. Note that a single session is not enough, and the number of treatments required may vary for each patient, although usually between 3 and 6 sessions are performed. Even so, results show from the first session.

Can you combine micro-needling and chemical peels?

What is a chemical peeling, and how does it work?

Can you combine chemical peels and micro-needling?

Chemical peeling is a non-surgical procedure that consists of applying a chemical agent directly on the skin in the face, neck, and other body parts. With this powerful treatment, dead cells are exfoliated to stimulate new cells that will give the skin a smoother and younger appearance.

Chemical peels use a solution that “peels off” the top layers of the skin to improve its texture and appearance while diminishing acne marks, wrinkles, sun damage, blemishes, and redness.  

There are superficial, medium, and deep peels, each indicated depending on the desired effect. All of them have a different healing time, and their application will depend on the evaluation of a dermatologist for each patient.


Can you do a chemical peeling after micro-needling?

Absolutely. Combining both techniques will improve the appearance of the skin internally and externally. It is recommended to perform the chemical peel first as this removes all the dead and old layers of skin.

After about 4 to 6 weeks, when the skin have recovered from the peeling, you can start micro-needling sessions to finish improving the most problematic areas.

Some people who have suffered from very severe acne do the treatment in reverse, attending the micro-needling sessions first to start the collagen production. That way, when the deep peeling is done, the skin heals better and has a more even tone.

In either case, it is essential to consult with certified skincare professionals who will recommend the ideal treatments to give your skin the aspect you have always wanted.

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